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Wind and carp?

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Can someone explain why wind is an advantage?

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Guest phonebush

Carpe,

Of course, there are a multitude of "reasons" to say carping is good in wind and an equal number of reasons to say the exact opposite.

Some of the good reasons:

Maybe first or most important is that the weather is changing - and that can go either way, good or bad.

I like to fish with the wind in my face, seems as though food sources come in with the wave action.

Wind can change the thermocline

It can change the channel action of the water temperature - or

it can change the temperature of the water at the depth you are angling

Phone

Lots more

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Primary factors when taking wind into account regarding carp fishing are:-

  1. Oxygenation
  2. Temperature change (can be negative or positive)
  3. Movement of food
  4. Movement of subsurface layers

Reasons:-

  1. Single Sitting Satisfaction - The fuller the stomach the more oxygen required. Thus with more oxygen comes the ability to eat for a longer period - given that temperatures are high enough to sustain eating, but that's something completely different
  2. Temperature changes can trigger or turn off feeding
  3. &
  4. Movement of subsurface layers can cause detrius to be moved on the bottom of the lake thus exposing beds of natural food and inducing carp to eat.

One more thing:-

The direction of the wind will have differing effects dependant on your location. here in California the following applies in Summer (generalization)

  • Northerly - very rare but usually cool and dry
  • Southerly - rare again but generally warm and wet
  • Easterly - warm and dry
  • Westerly - warm and wet

And in Winter (again a generalization)

  • Northerly - Cold and sometimes wet
  • Southerly - warmer and usually wet
  • Easterly - always cold, rarely wet and very rare
  • Westerly - cool and wet

Prevailing weather in my area is normally South to West in the summer and North to West in the winter. We always have onshore winds due to the warm air mass that builds over the central valley and the cold air from the Pacific (kept cold by the Alaskan current running down the coast).

Edited by Keith

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Wind: The Anglers Friend?

The old poem goes:

When the wind is in the north

The skillful fisher goes not forth

When the wind is in the south

It blows the bait in the fishes mouth

When the wind is in the west

Then it's the very best

But when the wind is in the east

It blows no good to man nor beast

Some people swear by the wind. I have other opinions. Here are some of my windy observations some may agree with.

The magazines will tell you that the in-the-know-fisherman knows to fish on the downwind side of lakes. Because the wind blows abundant food to these shores. Unfortunately most fish do not know this. What I experience on these windy shores is a lot of floating seaweed & debris blown at your lines. And big annoying waves.

A windy day may be more exciting to some because of all the false strikes you get. On a good day, the wind will have those big rollers coming in, and this wave action will keep the rod tips bouncing and those indicators jumping constantly.

You will be able to cover the margins much more effectively on a windy day. Mainly because you won't be able to cast much past them. If you are a freeliner, forget it. And chumming on a day like this? You'll be picking the corn out of your hair.

A windy day might be considered good for your health. Because of all the excercise you will get making those extra trips back to the truck for more clothes.

Or, if you have canoed out to an island, and are now windbound and wondering how you'll get back as hypothermia is setting in, you'll be keeping your cardiovascular rate up by stomping in place and vigorous hand rubbing.

I'll take nice sunny, warm, & calm conditions any day of the week.

-Ken

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Guest carpmann

Depends on the fish and the kind of fishing you are doing. When the lumps are finicky and hard to find I like the wind because i can use a bobber to move my bait around until I find them.

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I hate to fish in the wind. But I have always had my best days with a light to moderate brezze blowing. I have also had great success near boat launches or where waverunners are stirring up the bottom.

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Jerome

Before you ask. I did not let the cat out of the bag.

No. Really I DIDN'T! :D

Iain

Edited by redcoat

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Guest AnthonyR

I hate the wind. It makes free-lining pretty hard. It also makes it hard to detect bites and see below the surface. So even if it does get the fish feeding, it usually results in a bad session for me.

Edited by AnthonyR

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I have always done well fishing at the windy end of a lake, whatever I am fishing for. The wind does have to be a good one ie; A warm breeze. A cold wind could send the fish away from the windy end of a lake.

Jim Gibbinson has a very good chapter on wind/weather in his excellent book - Big Water Carp.

If you pay attention to wind it will be a great tool for you when tackling some of the many vast lakes here in the USA.

As Jim says in his Book "Get it wrong and you could be 2 miles away from the nearest carp" Or even further in the USA :D

Get it right and you could have the whole lake population at your feet :D

Acted on correctly, the wind can greatly aid you tackling new large daunting lakes where you really have no clue where to start. It could cut the area you need to concentrate on down to a few acres from hundreds.

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I love fishing in wind (South and West) during the summer especially when it's blowing hard (20+ km/hr) and in your face. It makes baiting up impossible with a catapult so I spod all of my bait in. I find the carp congregate close to shore and feed more heavily when the bottom gets stirred up.

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Guest Carp Zombie

This is interesting stuff.....

I caught my PB 40LB, 9OZ just at the end of rainshower which lasted about 3 - 4 hrs from between 12:00 midnight - 4:00am. During this rain, the wind was very strong. The wind was blowing away from me and the water had little white caps.

At the end of this rain shower, the wind changed direction and now was blowing towards me instead of away.

The sun was coming up and no more clouds. The water was alot calmer. Then thats when it happened.

10 minutes later here comes my PB.

I dont know if it was because of the wind or all of these events taking place but, I will never forget the chain of events that took place prior to catching my PB.

post-1381-1171558973_thumb.jpg

Edited by Carp Zombie

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Guest Herkel

This same topic was just discussed over on the ACS board but because of my lack of puter skills I'll try to re post my opinions on this subject here:lol: Wind can be a great tool to catch fish when used correctly. There are some strange things at work when the wind is blowing. For many years I have wondered why the fish seem to bite better when the wind was blowing :D A lot of these questions have already been addressed in this thread so I wont cover them again. There is one thing that has made me wonder through the years that could have something to do with this phenomenon. This has never been pr oven and this is only my thoughts on this subject. When I was a young boy we use to make home made walkie talkie's by punching a small hole in the bottom of a can and then running a string through it to another can. When the string was pulled tight we could talk to each other because the vibrations of our voice was transferred through the string to the other can. When the wind would blow you could hear as well as feel it. Sometimes it would tickle your ear :D I think the same thing happens when your fishing. The wind blows on your line and sends the vibrations down the line and it attracts the fish to the bait. When the fish picks up the bait it feels the buzzing and runs with the line{fish on} When the wind stops blowing the bite doesn't stop but the runs do :D As soon as the wind picks back up the runs soon follow. Maybe some day someone will design something to send vibrations through a rod to prove this theory :D I know they use it on some of the newer down riggers and it has been proven successful. There could be some $$ in this idea :D Herkel

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Guest Carp Zombie

To a fish, could wind be one of the signs that winter is coming?....wether its spring, summer or fall could it trigger an instinct that the fish may possess and wanna feed?....This might be a silly thought but, HERKEL you started it with the string and cans :D

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Guest Herkel
To a fish, could wind be one of the signs that winter is coming?....wether its spring, summer or fall could it trigger an instinct that the fish may possess and wanna feed?....This might be a silly thought but, HERKEL you started it with the string and cans :D

Ken thats not a silly question. I'm sure fish are like everything else, The only thing different is their environment. Migratory birds know when to head South for the winter because of the changes in the daylight hr's + the weather tells them it's time to put on the fat to make the long trip thats a head of them. If they didn't they would be too weak when they got there to survive. Fish do the same thing. Look at how salmon are affected by the weather. No rain,No wind =No run. I know the can thing sounds silly but the next time you fish in the wind, Tighten up your line and see how many runs you get. Then do the same when the wind dies down and see what happens. I'm sure there's truth to this theory or Cannon would have never put their $$ into it :D Herkel

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Guest Herkel
This same topic was just discussed over on the ACS board but because of my lack of puter skills I'll try to re post my opinions on this subject here:lol: Wind can be a great tool to catch fish when used correctly. There are some strange things at work when the wind is blowing. For many years I have wondered why the fish seem to bite better when the wind was blowing :D A lot of these questions have already been addressed in this thread so I wont cover them again. There is one thing that has made me wonder through the years that could have something to do with this phenomenon. This has never been pr oven and this is only my thoughts on this subject. When I was a young boy we use to make home made walkie talkie's by punching a small hole in the bottom of a can and then running a string through it to another can. When the string was pulled tight we could talk to each other because the vibrations of our voice was transferred through the string to the other can. When the wind would blow you could hear as well as feel it. Sometimes it would tickle your ear :D I think the same thing happens when your fishing. The wind blows on your line and sends the vibrations down the line and it attracts the fish to the bait. When the fish picks up the bait it feels the buzzing and runs with the line{fish on} When the wind stops blowing the bite doesn't stop but the runs do :D As soon as the wind picks back up the runs soon follow. Maybe some day someone will design something to send vibrations through a rod to prove this theory :D I know they use it on some of the newer down riggers and it has been proven successful. There could be some $$ in this idea :D Herkel

Phone, I brought this back up for you to respond to it because your old as dirt and I believe you were around when carp were first brought to this country :D It's kind of like your copper wire theory :D Herkel

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Guest SWMO

Interesting Herkel, wouldn't current do the same thing? If its true, the vibration, then one should fish at a 90 degree angle to the current. :D

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Guest Herkel
Interesting Herkel, wouldn't current do the same thing? If its true, the vibration, then one should fish at a 90 degree angle to the current. :D

I'm not sure :D If you were fishing current that strong that your line was vibrating I wouldn't think there would be that many carp there. Although I have fished several tail races for walleye that were like that and did quite well :D Herkel

Edited by Herkel

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macfish here. I too like the wind when I'm fishing for carp. When I'm going for other types of fish I tend to go to the side that the wind is blowing from. If there's a lot of heavy wind, fishing for fish other than carp is often very poor and frustrating, at least that's been my experience. If the wind is not too terribly strong I usually go to the side that the wind is hitting if I'm fishing for carp and it has usually been the right choice (although like Ken I then have to put on more clothes, jackets - I tend to get cold easily :D). I've tried the still side and the windblown side and most often I've found more active feeding carp at the windblown side. Like others I have heard and thought that maybe it has something to do with driving the food towards shore where the carp then congregate and feed. It may not be comfortable for me, but if it's where the fish are that's where I'll be. Jonathan

Edited by macfish

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