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Guest The Kernel

Bollocks isn't a slang word....or is it considered offensive legally. This was decided in an English court case where the Archbishop of Canterbury was prepared to testify (testi-fy?) on behalf of the term bollocks.

This is not a load of bollocks.

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"Bollocks" is a word meaning testicles in British English and in Hiberno-English. The word is often used figuratively, most commonly as a noun to mean "nonsense" or as an expletive following a minor accident or misfortune, but also in a number of other ways; as an adjective to mean "poor quality" or "useless", also as an adjective to mean "top quality" or "perfection" (eg. that carp is the bollocks!), and in various compound expressions. Owing to its versatility, bollocks has been called the Swiss Army Knife of andrological profanities.

Perhaps the best-known international use of the term in this sense is in the title of a Sex Pistols album. ( Never Mind the Bollocks).

Testimony in a resulting lawsuit over the "obscene" term demonstrated that in Old English the word referred to a priest, and could also be used to mean "nonsense"

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My bad..didn't know someone had beat me too it :D)

Edited by pmk00001

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Guest tma

ok busted , i must apologise if i have caused offence to anyone it was just to tempting, there is a story behind this if you are willing to listen to it.

a english comedian or as you say a stand up comic was visiting the states in the 70's when he came across a car with a private number plate which said BOLLOX , spelt diffrent i know but has the same meaning . Anyway he couldn't belive what he was seeing and found it very funny , he was standing on the side walk laughing his head of when a american lady came up to him and asked what the hell was so funny , he composed himself enough to point to the licence plate and she said bollocks is that some kind of english word .This started him off again into hysterics eventualy he composed himself enough to say to her yes it is.

Well she said to him what the hell does it mean.

the lady was very polite and jasper didn't have heart to tell her the real meaning as he didn't want to come across as a rude englishmen so he told her it was english slang for zit.The lady just said is that it and went away shaking her head.

After jasper returned to england he heard that the women visited england and walked into a drug store in the uk she walked upto the counter and asked the assistant have you got any cream for these bollocks on my face.

just imagine the look on the shop assistants face. hence bollocks=balls= testicles

once again sorry if i have caused offence it was just to tempting me bad :D

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I wish I had discovered this thread sooner! :D

Being part cockney all that pony is right easy to understand.

Gefilta yep you cant beat a belting ruby, when ya totally brahms,that burns ya khyber the next day when sat on the john having a king richard, cheese and rice. Well I'm going stop having a darby and go and have a gypsies and then a nice hot cuppa rosie.

Catch ya all later.

translated just for those that dont twig it.

(gefilta yep ya cant beat a belting CURRY, when ya totally PISSED, that burns ya ARSE, when sat on the TOILET having a TURD, JESUS CHRIST. Wel I'm going to stop having a MOAN and go and have a PISS and then a nice hot cup of TEA)

"

Woooooooooooow . . . And I thought we spoke the same language . . . :D:D Darf ich auch auf deutsch heir schreiben? :D

And Kevin, I think you missed your calling: you should have been a philologist:

""Bollocks" is a word meaning testicles in British English and in Hiberno-English. The word is often used figuratively, most commonly as a noun to mean "nonsense" or as an expletive following a minor accident or misfortune, but also in a number of other ways; as an adjective to mean "poor quality" or "useless", also as an adjective to mean "top quality" or "perfection" (eg. that carp is the bollocks!), and in various compound expressions. Owing to its versatility, bollocks has been called the Swiss Army Knife of andrological profanities.

Perhaps the best-known international use of the term in this sense is in the title of a Sex Pistols album. ( Never Mind the Bollocks).

Testimony in a resulting lawsuit over the "obscene" term demonstrated that in Old English the word referred to a priest, and could also be used to mean "nonsense""

Edited by Anna Werner

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i worked with a mexican guy who had a picture of that lp cover on a jacket, he asked me what it meant and couldnt believe it when i told him, a couple of weeks later the guy we worked for started talking verbal diarear, suited him, i'd had enough of him and said something like f%% me moosh you talk a load of bollocks, he gave me the most strange look while the mexican guy went into hiding crying with laughter, boss went away not really sure what went on.

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Reminds me of the Python RAF sketch :D

Squadron Leader

Top hole. Bally Jerry pranged his kite right in the how's your father. Hairy blighter, dicky-birdied, feathered back on his Sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harper's and caught his can in the Bertie.

Bovril

Er, I'm afraid I don't quite follow you, squadron leader.

Squadron Leader

It's perfectly ordinary banter, Squiffy. Bally Jerry ... pranged his kite right in the how's yer father ... hairy blighter, dicky-birdied, feathered back on his Sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harper's and caught his can in the Bertie.

Wingco

Sorry old man, we don't understand your banter.

Pilot

You know ... bally ten-penny ones dropping in the custard ... (searching for the words) um ... Charlie Choppers chucking a handful ...

Wingco

No, no ... sorr

Say it a bit slower, old chap.

Pilot

Slower banter, sir?

Wingco

Ra-ther!

Pilot

Um ... sausage squad up the blue end!

Squadron Leader

No, still don't get it.

Pilot

Um ... cabbage crates coming over the briny?

I must get out more....

"SAUSAGE EATERS AT SIX O'CLOCK!!!!!!!!".

"Come again?"

"THERE"S A HUN IN THE SUN!!!!!!" etc. etc..........brilliant stuff!

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English to American Carp Translations

I remember not so long ago that someone put together a translation of pay lake terms. I really enjoyed that. In fact, it helped me better understand what was meant when I hear something like, "Except for one yeller I mildewed today." I got to thinking (yes, it even happens to me occaisionally) that a translation from UK English to American English might be helpful.

Ale - beer purchased by the pint instead of by the can.

Angler - A person that fishes with hook and line, a fisherman

Bangers - Breakfast sausages

Backlead - A weight attached to the line near the rod tip to hold most of the line close to the bottom.

Backwind - A technique used before reels with smooth drags were developed.

Bag up - To catch many many fish. It may come from match fishing where fish are kept until the end of the match and then released.

Bailiff - The person in charge of collecting payments for fishing and for enforcing the fishery's rules.

Baiting Needle - A device used to impale hard baits so they may be threaded onto a hair rig.

Baitrunner - A type of spinning reel that allows line to be pulled under minimal resistance when the baitrunner mechanism is engaged. It is used to prevent the entire rod from being pulled into the water.

Base Mix - The dry ingredients used to make boilies. Often dry base mix is sold and anglers add their own eggs, flavours and other enhancers.

Bed Chair - A lawn recliner on steroids. Makes camping out and sleeping beside the rods much more comfortable.

Beta light - A small radio-isotope that glows in the dark. Often attached in critical positions to help an angler find or position objects in the dark.

Big pit reel - A very large spooled spinning reel (often surf fishing size). Used to aid in distance casting as may be required on large flooded gravel pits common in the UK.

Bits-n-bobs - Odds and Ends

Bitter - A type of beer.

Bivvy - Short for bivouac. In practice it means Tent.

Blank - To not catch anything as in I blanked.

Blinkered - A term stolen from horse riding which meaning you cannot see to either side, just straight ahead. In practicle terms it means a person who is locked into a single way of doing and seeing things.

Bobbin - Almost anything hung on the line to provide a visual indicataion of line movement, hopefully from a fish.

Boilie - A egg based doughball that has been hardened by boiling. The main intent is to prevent small nuisance fish from pecking away the bait before a carp can find it.

Bolt Rig - A rig intended to frighten the fish into bolting (running off) so that the heavy weight will effectively hook the fish as it swims away.

Bomb - Another word for sinker, see also lead.

Bonnet - The hood of the car.

Boot - The trunk of the car.

Breadflake - The flaky white part of the bread without the crust. Lightly pinched it floats. Tightly pinched it sinks slowly. A very adaptable bait.

Brolly - Short for Umbrella. In practice, it is an umbrella big enough to camp under. Many begin to resemble open sided tents.

Buzzers - An audible bite alarm that sounds when line moves through the sensor.

Carbon - Graphite.

Carryall - a giant duffle bag use to haul carp gear.

Catapult - Slingshot used to fire out baits like boilies or corn

Centrepin - A type of reel similar to a fly reel but very finely machined to allow line to be freely pulled off along with the current.

Chips - As in Fish and Chips, it means fried potatos like frech fries.

Chuffed - Very pleased or happy as in "I caught a new personal best, I am well chuffed!"

Chum mixer - A brand of Purina dog food in the UK. It is use frequently as a floating bait to catch carp on the surface.

Clooping - The sound made and act of carp sucking items from the surface.

Clutch - The reel's drag mechanism.

Coarse fish - Rough fish, fish other than salmon and trout.

Cockles - Some sort of shelfish occaisionaly tried as bait.

Comics - A derisive term referring to the angling publications sold in the UK.

Common - The regular scaled version of carp with normal sized scales.

Controller - A type of bobber used when fishing surface baits. The controller provides weight for the cast while still floating.

Cuppa - Slang for Cup of Tea or Cup of Coffee.

Curtain - A thin relatively delicate section of skin within the carp's mouth. An intact curtain is a good indication the carp has never been caught before.

Dangler - see "Bobbin"

Day ticket - A fishery where anglers must pay a daily fee to have the privledge to fish.

Death rig - A rig that would doom the carp to an untimely death if broken off during the fight. Examples of potential death rigs are treble hooks if they hook in both the upper an lower lip, multi hook rigs that might tether a carp to a snag, or rigs unable to allow the lead to come off that might result in the carp draging a lead around until it hangs up and tethers the fish in place.

DIY - An acronym for Do It Yourself. It is very similar in usage to home made or hand made.

Dogs Bollix - A slang term meaning very good or lucky. For example, this new bait catches a whacker every cast! Its the dogs bollix. In reallity it means the mutts nuts or testicles.

Dropback - A type of bite when the fish swims toward you creating slack rather than swimming away.

Estate lake - A farm pond.

Estate wagon - A stationwagon.

Fag - A cigarette.

Feeder - A device attached to the line which is filled with groundbait to be released in the vicinity of the bait on the hook.

Fish Finder - Sonar Depth Finder

Fixed spool reel - A spinning reel.

Float - Means bobber but usually closer to a pencil bobber. There are many, many varieties of floats.

Floaters - Baits like chum mixer that float on the surface.

Football - Soccer.

Ghostie - Carp with an odd whitish coloring and darker patches around the eyes.

Greedy pig rig - 3 or more baits on a hair. Intended to attract big greedy carp.

Groundbait - A mixture of ingredients that may be moistened to stick together. The mixture is place near the bait on the hook to attract more fish than the bait alone might attract. It is very similar to packbait except it is usually place around a feeder or the lead rather than around the hook.

Guesting - A nice word for tresspassing. Occaisionally done to fish an off limits area or water.

Hair rig - A rig using a hook with a short lenght of line (the hair) coming off the shank of the hook. The hair rig allows hard baits to be fished without blocking the hook point. See in depth discussions elsewhere.

Hair Stop - A little piece of plastic used to keep hard baits from sliding off the hair once they have been threaded on.

Heron heads - An early design of bite alarm that used line tension to pull two pieces of metal into contact, thereby completing a circuit and sounding an alarm.

HNV - An acronym meaning High Nutrition Value. It is a theory that carp will sense what foods (baits) are most nutritious and will preferrably eat these to fulfill its needs with the least amount of effort. The theory has lead to a large number of scientifically and quasi-scientifically designed baits that attempt to provide the carp with everything it needs nutritionally.

Holdall - Not to be confused with the carryall, a hold all is a rod bag capable of hauling aound several rods with reels attached an more rods without reels. Most have room for banksticks, a rod pod, the landing net, and even a brolly.

Holiday - Another word for Vacation.

Hooklength - The bit of line tied to the hook. In the USA it is typically called a leader.

Horses for courses - A typical phrase meaning different conditions require different solutions. No one thing is always applicable.

Indicator - Any visual device used to show line movement.

Isotopes - see "beta-light."

Jammy - A slang term meany lucky.

Keep sack - An alternative to a stringer. A sack used to hold a live carp until release. Made of breathable fabric with a locking draw string and a means for tying off to a fixed point on shore.

Kilo - Not really British but a euro means of expressing weight. One Kilo is about 2 lbs.

King Carp - Any of the large fast growing carp strains that have been developed. The carp imported to the USA back in the late 1800's were King Carp.

Kip - Sleep. Usually expressed as in "I'm going to lie down, close my eyes, and get a bit of kip."

Kipper - Slang for a big fish.

Knackered - Tired, sleepy, exhuasted.

Larder - A food storage or collection area. For example the base of a bar may collect food and form a natural larder.

Lead - A term meaning sinker. The heavy weight used to aid in casting and holding the line on the bottom.

Leader - Usually means a snag leader. This is a heavy peice of line use to prevent heavy leads from breaking off on a forceful cast.

Leather - A rare type of carp having no scales whatsoever.

Linear - A type of mirror carp (see below) having a line of scales along the lateral line.

Line aligner - A method of attaching a the hook that creates an optimal hooking angle.

Linebites - Fish bumping into the line and giving false indications.

Lobworm - Night crawler. A big fat variety of earthworm.

Lorry - A truck or van.

Mainline - The majority of the line on the reel not including a shock leader or backing if present.

Maize - Actaully an American Indian word for corn. It specifically refers to the hard animal feed corn that is often sold as any of the following: Whole corn, cleaned corn, recleaned corn, feed corn, deer corn, or whole kernal corn.

Margin - The zone along the shoreline. Fishing "in the margins" means fishing close to shore.

Mate - A friend, nothing more (Seriously).

Mirror - A type of carp having few but large scales. Usually there are patches of skin without scales. Sometimes the large scales cover the entire fish creating a fully scaled mirror.

Monkey climber - A visual indicator designed to be wind resistant. An indicator is place on the line and then threaded down a stiff wire stuck in the ground. The movement of the indicator up and down the wire must have reminded some creative soul of a monkey climbinb up and down a pole.

Mug - A frequently caught and photographed fish. Refers to a mug shot.

Multiplier - A level-wind baitcasting reel that rotates the spool multiple time for each complete crank of the handle.

Noddy - A slang term for an inexperienced begginner.

Old hat - means old fashion, known, not new.

Optonics - An old brand of bite alarm that functioned by placing the line on a roller. This was a step forward over the Herons because both pulls and drop back bites could be detected.

Particles - A generic term meaning seeds, beans, nuts, or vegetable used for bait.

Pasties - A slang term for small carp.

Paste - A term meaning doughbait.

PB - Personal Best, the biggest of a particular kind of fish, for example a PB common or a PB mirror or a PB grass carp

Peg - When fishing in a competition, it is the location allotted. Usually there is a drawing for pegs at the beginning of the competion.

Pint - Much more than a unit of measure, it means beer.

Pissed - In the UK this means drunk rather than angry. I downed 5 rum and cokes, now I'm pissed.

Pit - Short for gravel pit. In the UK nearly any hole in the ground fills with water. The gravel pits often produce small numbers of large carp.

Plumbing - A technique used to feel the bottom and measure the depth. Typically, a sliding sinker is placed on the line. A largish bobber is then tied to the end of the line. The combination is cast out. The bobber is reeled up tight to the sinker on the bottom. Then line is pulled from the reel in 1 ft increments. The depth is determined by counting the feet until the bobber surfaces.

Polaroids - Polarized sunglasses intended to cut the reflective glare and make it easier to see fish beneath the surface.

Pop-up - A type of boilie designed to float. Often held close to the bottom by a small weight placed on the line near the hook. Allows the bait to be fished above leaves, weeds, soft silt, etc.

Pre-baiting - chumming. Throwing in free bait to attract the fish to an area. Often pre-baiting is conducted for many days before fishing. Extensive pre-baiting is called a baiting campaign.

Public house - Longhand for Pub, a beer drinking and social establishment

PVA - poly Vinyl Acetate A plastic like material that disolves in water. It is often used to attach extra bait near the hook an the dissolve away before the fish comes along. It is made into bags, string, mesh bags etc.

Quiver - A holder for transporting fishing rods. Similar to an archery quiver with the rods replacing the arrows.

Readymades - Boilies that are premade and bought at the tackle shop. Al(ready made) and ready to fish.

Recce - To check out an area without fishing. Watching for signs of fish, patterns, other anglers, etc.

Remote - A wireless unit that sounds a bite alarm even when the fisherman is some distance from the rods or inside a shelter.

Result - A catch of fish as in, "We had quite a result."

Rod pod - A rod holder for use during fishing. Unlike a forked stick, a rod pod is able to be set up on concrete and other hard surfaces.

Rota - short for rotation. On some sydicates (see below) the fishermen fish the waters in shifts. Some the first half of the week others the second half or maybe on a week off a week.

Running rig - A rig using a sliding weight. The fish should be able to move with the bait without feeling the resistance of the weight.

Screamer - A rapid take which causes the alarm to sound in a fast series of beeps that blend into a constant screaming monotone.

Semi-fixed - A means of attaching a weight so that it does not freely slide yet can slide or come off if a fish is broken off during the fight. Bolt rigs are semi-fixed. The lead is held tighlty enough to hook the fish but not so tightly it cannot be pulled off when the mainline breaks.

Session - The time spent fishing. Often measured in days for Uk fishermen. Session fishing involves a combination of camping and fishing around the clock.

Shoal - A School of fish.

Smashed - Means the line was broken by a fish.

Snide Rod - An extra rod beyond that legally allowed.

Snotty - A descriptive term for a bream. Bream are a nusiance species that often take carp anglers baits.

Snowman rig - A method of attaching two boilies on a single hair with the heavier sinking boilie nearest the hook and the pop-up nearest the hair stop. In profile it resembles a two section snowman.

Social - A friendly get together. For example, it was raining so we decided to stay indoors and have a bit of a social until the flood waters receded."

Specimen - A large example of any species. A specimen carp is a trophy, lunker, or hawg.

Spod - A cup like device used to cast and dump bait in a fishing area. Often the device is shaped like a rocket with fins to help it fly strait. The nose is fitted with foam so it floats up and dumps the bait cargo out the back.

Stalking - A method of fishing which involves quietly sneeking up on visible fish and presenting baits to them with great stealth so as not to frighten the fish away.

Stringer - Very different than the American meaning. Here it means a length of PVA string with a few free baits attached as in a 3 bait stringer.

Sultanas - Raisins!

Swan shot - A type of adjustable sinker form by doubling over a short length of mono and then pinching on a string of split shot. The weight is adjusted by removing or adding split shot. It has the benefit of pulling free from the line when snagged.

Swim - A fishing spot. In the UK, many waters have specially prepared areas to make for easier bank angling. Each prepared area is called a swim. Often the swims have descriptive names like "The Island Swim" or "The Bog Swim."

Swinger - A type of visual indicator which can swing up and down as a fish pulls line, but not side to side in the wind.

Sydicate - A group of fishermen that pay money to fish a specific body of water on an ongoing basis. Often the most desired waters have more fishermen wanting to fish than bank space available. In such cases lengthy waiting lists may develop.

Take - A bite or a run when the carp picks up the bait and moves away.

Take away - A drive-thru or carry out food seller.

Taking the piss - Making fun of someone. Making jokes at someone elses expense. For example, "Are you seriously belittling me or are you just taking the piss?"

Throwing Stick - A tubular stick used to throw spherical boiled baits long distances. The throwing stick starts with the bait near the handle. As the throwing motion is made the bait rolls toward the tip picking up speed as it travels. By the time the bait reaches the tip it is hurled at a great velocity.

Tiger Nut - The root nodules of the yellow nutsedge plant. Also called earth almonds and chufa. The nut like nodules are soaked and boiled to produce an effective carp bait that often avoids the attentions of other species.

Torch - Flashlight

Trace - A carry over term from salt water fishing meaning the line attached to the hook, in American terms, the leader.

Unhooking Mat - A pad used to protect the fish while removing the hook. Any padded material that prevents the carp from getting cut and scraped up while lying on the bank can function as an unhooking mat. This item helps the angler return the fish in as nearly the same condition as when it was caught so other anglers can also enjoy catching a healthy fish rather than a tattered one.

Venue - This term refers to the location being fished and is wider in scope than the term swim. For example, "The Chicago River as it flowed between the skyscrapers of downtown Chicago used to be the venue of the CCC."

Waggler - An elongated bobber resembling a pencil bobber.

Watercraft - The ability to read a water and to determine where fish will be located and feeding.

Weigh sling - A device used to cradle the fish during the weighing process. Carp are too heavy to weigh from the lip or gill without inflicting serious damage. A weigh sling is used to hold the carp while the straps from the weigh sling are attached to the scale. An honest fisherman always discounts the weight of the weigh sling when reporting the weight of the fish.

Whacker - Slang term for an unusually large fish. In America we'd call a whacker a lunker, as whopper, or a Hawg!

Wildie - Before King Carp were bred to grow fast and large, the predominant variety of carp in England were smaller, lean looking commons. These fish came to be known as wildies. While not as large as the King Carp, they are now prized for their scarcity.

Zig rig - A rig used to fish a boyant bait up in mid water. Achieved by folding the a long length of line beyond the sinker in a zig zag manner. The folded line is then tied together with dissolving PVA. Once cast, the PVA dissolves and allows the boyant bait to float up off the bottom to the length of the folded line.

Oh yes, I hate to be a pedant old chap, but it's CENTREPIN, not Centerpin............

Now I must go and investigate a strange noise above me noggin. I think we've got TRILBYS in the attic ( Trilby hat=Rat).

I really must get out more too! Toodle pip!!

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Guest stoph

take the piss is a way of making someone the butt of a joke, saying meeoww when your buddy hooks his 5th catfish of the day is taking the piss. or your buddy could say "damn, these cats are just takin the piss now". the cleaner version is 'taking the mickey'.

a stringer in the u.k is a length of p.v.a string with boilies or other free offerings to get the fish feeding.

and i believe all you north american carpers are on board now with the method feeder and fishing the method!

and for the record the full monty breakfast should include some bread fried in the bacon grease, mmmmmm, and of course a little black pudding, and yea thats fried pigs blood!

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take the piss is a way of making someone the butt of a joke, saying meeoww when your buddy hooks his 5th catfish of the day is taking the piss. or your buddy could say "damn, these cats are just takin the piss now". the cleaner version is 'taking the mickey'.

Now, can one "take the piss" into his pal's baitbucket?

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Guest GARP
Now, can one "take the piss" into his pal's baitbucket?

Not quite Scott - that would be "taking a piss". Hmm, wondering if there's any betaine in urine - you could be onto something here...

Gary.

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Talking of Cats -- there is a cute (Aaaaargh I hate those things!!) name often used for them -- "Stevens" (as in Cat Stevens)

Another "pet" name for them is "Moggies" - Brit slang for cats.

Cheers,

Brid.

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It's all gone Pete Tong

You're 'aving a Giraffe aint ya? I would add some more to this enthralling thread, but I'm already in "Barney Rubble" with the "Trouble and Strife" for spending too much time on the computer.

Maybe I'll get braver next time I'm "pissed as a handcart" ( Newlyn fish market, circa. 1987). Oh 'es me 'andsome!

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Miggy --

Pete Tong = wrong. Giraffe = laugh. Barney Rubble = trouble. Trouble & Strife = wife. Pissed as a handcart = drunk.

Simple really :rolleyes:

Cheers,

Brid.

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Guest stoph

any chance i could bum a fag?................... honestly its not as it sounds!

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Guest lee

whys every tom ,dick and arry talking like me ?...you avin a bubble or what gez,im sitting ear on me arris saying "gor blimey strike a light".

thought you might like this web site,it might help the yanks...lol

http://www.cockneyrhymingslang.co.uk/rabbit

now this should be funny,come on you septic tanks. ....talk to me...lmao.

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