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KingCarp

Advanced Photography - Camera Settings

47 posts in this topic

I'm starting this separate topic, because most will otherwise quickly loose track of the basics.

First I think its better I show you how to make better use of your camera, the problem pictures I will take care off.

For questions about the settings its better to do that here.

Please do not quote to much, it will make it hard for others to keep track. Thanks.

Camera settings for self-portrait with fish.

I bet that 80% of you guys, whether you own a compact or a reflex camera only use the AUTO setting, unfortunately.

I would like to offer you a few changes in your settings that will dramatically improve your ability to make a better photo;

I advise you to change the settings as advised below for self-portrait with fish and do not change! These settings will also do for landscape pictures.

A- Set your camera to the A for Aperture preference mode. [sometimes called AV]

B- Set the aperture value- the F value at a minimum of f5,6 or for reflex camera’s f8,0

C- Choose highest possible resolution, preferable RAW or highest jpg mode.

D- Set fixed Red-Eye correction.

ISO value compensates for dark or sunny conditions; AWB means it fixes it automatically,

When its very sunny ISO 50 or 100 will do best.

In low light setting -cloudy day ISO 400-800 will do much better.

For flash, set camera at lowest ISO, 50 better than 100

Test your flash at home, each camera has 'flash compensation', try it!

Do not take flash pictures head on, better at an angle to prevent too much 'flashburn'

Better to have background cover instead of water and sky, why you ask?

Camera will measure an average, as water and sky cover biggest part of the picture this will result in you and the fish being too dark.

You can change to 'spotmetering', now the camera will focus on the center of the picture.

Edited by KingCarp

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Start Each of your photography topics with "Advanced Photography -

I will Pin them and add them to another section at a later stage.

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Explain reflex camer please king.

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Explain reflex camer please king.

"SLR" Single Lens Reflex.

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So my fuji finepix s1000d isn't an slr correct?

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So my fuji finepix s1000d isn't an slr correct?

Correct, your S1000D is what I call a " "SLR" styled" camera. The look and feel, but not SLR.

SLR's could always be identified by the fact that they had interchangeable lenses and normal digitals not. But these days they are making NON-SLR's with changeable lenses.

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I'll do that and thanks for the help Willem!

Due to the time difference I wasn't able to help, just woke up! The Advanced Photography topic kept me up until 03.30.

Willem already explained nicely Carpaholic, but here you can find more.

http://www.digicamguides.com/learn/slr-vs-compact.html

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Whitebalance; when you set your camera for RAW you can simply use AWB or Automatic White Balance, because its easy to correct on your computer.

A tutorial;

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RAW vs Jpg tutorial

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Very helpful,

thanks for taking the time to explain this and the videos are great.

Great job :)

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Aperture Priority Mode tutorial

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Some good advice here...

However very few Digital SLR's offer ISO settings below 200 (or actually need to compared to film).

I would also suggest that most folk start with an aperture setting of around 6.3 or 7.1(less than that and you might mess up the focus on a prize catch!). Or at least try a range so that you capture a bunch of shots with different depth of fields.

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However very few Digital SLR's offer ISO settings below 200 (or actually need to compared to film).

Of course these are general rules, but if possible in very sunny conditions an ISO 50-100 will give you much better contrast. My Canon G6 has it [ a compact even!] so does my Canon 5D.

I think Savay means f6.3 to f7.1 for compacts? Not neccesarily, because the much smaller camera chips in compacts already give much more depth of field. Cannot hurt either, but that's why I adviced the Aperture Priority Mode in the first place. There is a big difference between DSLR and Compact regarding depth of field. For DSLR I advise f8.0 or higher. [higher means smaller aperture!]

Look at Jerome's picture in the other Advanced Photography topic, it was probably shot in P or Auto

According to the EXIF file [the settings of your camera will appear on your computer] that photo was taken with f2.8 and isn't too shallow depth of field.That was a Compact.

Edited by KingCarp

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Camera ISO settings tutorial

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Of course these are general rules, but if possible in very sunny conditions an ISO 50-100 will give you much better contrast. My Canon G6 has it [ a compact even!] so does my Canon 5D.

I think Savay means f6.3 to f7.1 for compacts? Not neccesarily, because the much smaller camera chips in compacts already give much more depth of field. Cannot hurt either, but that's why I adviced the Aperture Priority Mode in the first place. There is a big difference between DSLR and Compact regarding depth of field. For DSLR I advise f8.0 or higher. [higher means smaller aperture!]

Look at Jerome's picture in the other Advanced Photography topic, it was probably shot in P or Auto

According to the EXIF file [the settings of your camera will appear on your computer] that photo was taken with f2.8 and isn't too shallow depth of field.That was a Compact.

f2.8 is an incredibly 'shallow' depth of field. At the range that shot was taken a depth of field of f2.8 would be in the order of a few inches (which clearly is not the case in the image).

I think you might be confusing Focal Length with Depth of Field... Most compact digital cameras have lens very short focal lengths of 2.8 - 4.6 which offers the maximum depth of field.

Scroll down on this link for more info: Depth of Field vs Focal Length

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Hi Savay, thanks for your input. Sorry when things get confusing, but as you know English is NOT my native tongue, but...

f2.8 is an incredibly 'shallow' depth of field. At the range that shot was taken a depth of field of f2.8 would be in the order of a few inches (which clearly is not the case in the image).

You say that Jerome's picture was not taken at f2.8 correct?

In that case you get confused, because the EXIF file clearly shows f2.8 !

-Its the 'proof' that novices usually leave camera setting in AUTO or P mode

-It proves just my point that a COMPACT camera will never have a really SHALLOW depth of view, because of the very small chip!

I did not add a YouTube clip, nor the link you just posted,DEPTH OF VIEW TUTORIAL,because that outcome demonstrates clearly the 'shallow depth of view' possible with a Digital SLR, which is very different and highly confusing for our novices right now.

We both intent to offer them the option to take A picture with greater depth of field, I know for a compact f5,6 would do that. NOT so for a DSLR I totally agree, but have stated above clearly a f8.0 for DSLR.

I do agree you could set the compact at f6,3 or f7,1..but those are [for compacts] its maximum too...only problem, for the novice again, he will use 'my settings' mostly all the time too and might forget to see a 'low light warning'

As man-fish photo will always be shot at a 3-5 ft range the suggested f5,6 will do that plus reserves a bit more 'low light' options without changing the settings.

Do appreciate your input though, because these discussions should be telling for our novices, agree?

thanks BOB

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A picture tells a thousand words!

Here's a photo of a guest, with a nice 34 LB carp. Not too bad a picture too, you agree?

34lbpiet.jpg

Please check the EXIF file data I copied form Photoshop!

f5,6 just as I predicted.And plenty of 'depth of field' A Pentax Optio which is a COMPACT.

scamp.png

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I'll do you one better.

Again Piet, this 35 Lb he took early in the morning, the lucky sod had the 34 Lb after lunch.

The picture is a bit dark, on purpose I did not try the enhance it, you see what would happen with your suggested f6,3 to f7,1 for compacts? It would be too dark and or blurred because of the lack of shutterspeed, and I'm pretty sure most novices would not notice until after!

35lbpiet.jpg

Look at the EXIF data,..this shot was even taken at f2,8 same compact!

exifii.png

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I'll do you one better.

Again Piet, this 35 Lb he took early in the morning, the lucky sod had the 34 Lb after lunch.

The picture is a bit dark, on purpose I did not try the enhance it, you see what would happen with your suggested f6,3 to f7,1 for compacts? It would be too dark and or blurred because of the lack of shutterspeed, and I'm pretty sure most novices would not notice until after!

35lbpiet.jpg

Look at the EXIF data,..this shot was even taken at f2,8 same compact!

exifii.png

I think we are talking the same language... I just wanted to make sure that folk don't assume f2.8 on a compact is the same as f2.8 on a DSLR...

There is a great saying by Photojournalists... "f/8 and be there", meaning that being "on the scene" is more important than worrying about technical details. The aperture of f/8 gives adequate depth of field, assuming a 35 mm or DSLR camera, minimum shutter-speed, and ISO film rating within reasonable limits subject to lighting.

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Bob, lian,

Mind possibly starting a thread that's not quite a's advanced? Perhaps some tutorials on just how to set aperture in different situations such a's macro, or super macro? And just for compacts? Distinguishing between the compact info and dslr info is very confusing. Thanks it's very much appreciated!

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"f/8 and be there", meaning that being "on the scene" is more important than worrying about technical details"

Bang on!!!

f this and . that..... lol yes it all has its importance.

How ever what happend to the days of just shooting a shot!

LOL!

enjoying the post's and the free tut's are for some im sure helping very much!

thank you!

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This already is really basic stuff Carpoholic, the only confusion is because of Savay's explanations.

I do give the tips ; for novices - based on compacts as I assume that group will mostly have compacts.

For the ones that have a reflex and don't use it properly, they too should be able to understand this, and they shopuld benefit as well.

From the interaction between Savay and myself it should make things more clear to you.

For you as a novice I urge you to do just as explained. As explained those settings will do for; man and carp / landscape/portrait. When you have done that and wonder what to do in a special event, please do ask.

The only remark that remains from your question; Macro...I will look for a basic video tutorial and come back to you.

Please keep communicating, I need your feedback!

And there are few silly questions, don't be ashamed! [and if so, ask me by PM or email]

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Photoguys,

Sunday, I traded in my 12 yr old cell phone for a new freebie. WoW! it has a camera. The only thing the instructions say is that it is 1.3mp. So?

Phone

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Photoguys,..hahaha nice touch Phone! :lol:

I found this four part video tutorial, I have zero experience with cellphone photography.

I did notice however that once you see the video, you should better understand the tips I already gave...they seem to be simular.

I will only post part I, follow the YouTube link for part 2, 3 and 4

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