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KingCarp

Advanced Photography - Camera Settings

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Macro Photography Basics.

Carpoholic especially for you a video tutorial, I'm afraid as compacts go that is the limitation too as you will not have nearly as many setting options as a DSLR will have.

The most important pointers are stated at the end and I totally agree; always use a tripod and shutter timer mode or a real remote to avoid movements

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My camera is the cross breed of dslr's and compacts. It's a fuji finepix s1000f, it's very sleek and has nearly every function that I've seen on many dslr's iso adjustment, macro and super macro, aperture, shutterspeed. I'm not completely novice but thought a good tutorial and dialogue could certainly help. Google my camera, it's very versatile and takes a great picture and video a's well. My problem is getting the lighting right for super macro shots, I can get up to 2 cm from the object, just the aperture a's I raise the f stop the darker the picture, obviously I need to introduce light but ambient light because I want to eliminate shadows and such. I write for uscarppro and I need the ability to take some very close up rig shots a's well a's glossy fish pix.

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'Crossbreed DSLR' is what the producer would like you to think, your camera is a higher end COMPACT no comparison with a DSLR. So to stay within average [limited] compact tips;

If possible use RAW option.

Set for standard A mode, but when the standard light range is not enough, set for M mode

Play ISO setting, the higher ISO the more shutterspeed but also more grainy! You have to test for your camera what is max.

Take 4-5 second shots or longer, this compensates for the loss of light.

There is no zoom option in Macro So tripod essential!! There are special tripods with horiziontal zoom option.

A to get to exact depth range, remember no zoom so only inches play.

B to make it possible 4-5 seconds open shutter are neccesary [ps only manual mode M]

C you need to set shutter timer too, each touch to camera will distort, remote is possible too.

This you have to practice first before I'm able to help more.

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"f/8 and be there", meaning that being "on the scene" is more important than worrying about technical details"

Bang on!!!

f this and . that..... lol yes it all has its importance.

Sorry I already explained how these remarks are VERY confusing for others,..please again, standard tip is for COMPACT, I add comments for DSLR. My pictures more than proved my point.

F8,0 IS A STANDARD SETTING FOR DSLR

F5,6 is enough for most compacts,and MAN WITH FISH, only change to highest F value for landscape photo.

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KingCarp,

Thank you for taking the time to share and post all this info for I know that this is very helpful to people. But for me all this is giving me a big headache :hammerhead::bonk::lol::lol: . I may take you up on your initial offer and send you a couple pics for you to touch up for me when you have the time in the future.

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No problem mate, see your PM, I'll do it right away!

Photos sent. Thank you very much for offering to do this! :yourock: Your retouched pictures will appear in the next NACA magazine!

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No problem, see your mailbox, you've got them back.Plus some tips for the future. Good luck with the article.

KingCarp, you are a true artist! The photos you retouched for me are just incredible! I will resubmit the photos and ask that my original crappy photos be replaced by your awesome ones :):yourock: Thank you so much!

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It was fun doing it and you gave me to the proof that what I write here is mostly for you guys, the ones with the compacts, the 80%, the auto mode boys, who desperately need to know! :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

The other 20% will have totally different type of problems, mostly DSLR users [of which I'm afraid there are a bunch also still using auto mode]

So read the tips and keep them coming the questions. :D

stanicet.jpg

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For those trying to see it but don't have Photoshop, you can aslo access the phote info by right clicking on the picture and select "Properties" --> Details.

You will see this:

post-5480-0-59382600-1296525786.png

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i love this topic ... :) awesome post sir, you have really really great and helpful material on this topic with lots of tips and techniques.... thank you :yourock:

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We aim to please!

I will add the exif data to a photo, that might help too.

Canon compact f4,5 1/125 [again you can see for a compact enough depth of field]

sunsetii.jpg

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NIKON D70 DSLR- Aperture Priority f/10 1/30

helefraaiesunset.jpg

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Metering Mode tutorial

Pay attention barbelfloat, this is very important for the type of shots you let me retouch!

Your camera was set for 'Evaluative Metering Mode', the video explains better why your shots were underexposed as to your carp.

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After you watched the Metering Modes tutorial a few tips;

Those that like to take a picture with water on the background, you should set your metering mode for spot or center mode. The light emitted by the water, and the reflection, make most auto mode shots focus on the background and make you and the fish appear dark. [underexposed]

A more advanced option is to come closer to the fish, engage the shutter halfway and when it locks,biep, hold the shutter, step back and than take the picture. Not sure of the correct english for this.

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For some reason you tutorial videos(or links) don't show up in this topic on my computer screen. I have Microsoft and use IE. My internet connection is very slow, so I probably could not view them in a reasonable time period anyway. Thanks for this topic, there is lots of useful info even without the videos.

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Sorry to hear that Spoon, I'm sure its your computer. I'm not big on Windows, but would advise to start using FireFox or Google Chrome, hopefully someone here can help better!

Do let us know!

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In Aperture Priority mode you set the f-value yourself, for the rainbow and it being a DSLR, I choose f/11,0

The camera in Priority mode, gives preference to the Aperture setting and automatically computes the necessary shutter speed in this case 1/125 of a second.

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aperture is fun to play with...

19733_1316563672647_1187388802_30971420_2795219_n.jpg

27942_1443522046527_1187388802_31315416_3898995_n.jpg

40451_1581989668131_1187388802_31692018_5026949_n.jpg

8335_1254996053495_1187388802_30787053_2480857_n.jpg

6011_1210674465483_1187388802_30635418_6933548_n.jpg

19733_1317563697647_1187388802_30974865_6006941_n.jpg

19733_1316552392365_1187388802_30971392_845878_n.jpg

65958_1647673390183_1187388802_31845917_7371488_n.jpg

40866_1639271420139_1187388802_31829163_7715699_n.jpg

Edited by frogfish

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Sorry wanted to change picture but had to delete old one.

This is the f/11,0 in aperture priority, DSLR Camera at 1/125 of a second

potsofgold.jpg

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all were shot at f/2.6 except no 3,4,5. Those were shot between f/3 and f/5...dont know for sure.

All manually metered

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Just before you saw the pot of gold;

DSLR f/11,0 1/125 sec ISO 160

tworainbowsi.jpg

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Hello KC,

I am using the settings guidance you recommend in your OP here (I now have a used G6), and all works well except for shooting I need to do in my usual boat fishing situation --

Umbrella up, covering transom end of my 16 ft jonboat

Camera on tripod on seat transom end of boat, shooting out

Me at other end of boat holding carp & remote.

Result -- underexposed shots, to varying extent depending on light/sun levels. Of course all is well at night with flash (lol)

Because I have RAW image, I am able to tweak the image to something vaguely approvimating reality after the fact

Can you recommend what settings I should use or action i should take?

..., ( other than a) hold the fish at the dark end of boat & use fill-in flash, B) take down the brolly every time I get a decent fish).

Any guidance would be much appreciated

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Hi Tim,

Sorry I did not react sooner, however since mid May I travel the Canadian borders of the st Lawrence again. :rolleyes: I just took a break because of the spawning and to allow my body some rest after 6 weeks of brutal carpin.

When I understand correctly you refer to low light situations because of the use of the umbrella.

The first fix could be to alter the metering mode to spotmetering.

The same tip I would use but without the umbrella, depending on where the sun is of course.

Fill-in flash is the next obvious tip, but that apparently doesn't work to your satisfaction.

When help is around you can have the shooter come right close up, active the shutter,..hold the shutter..walk back or zoom out and than take the picture.

Also this 'proofs' its a metering mode problem.

Try the 'spotmetering' mode first.

Ps PM me if you don't hear of me quickly.

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Thanks for the tips, KC - 'Spotmetering' it'll need to be for me given the 'one man in a boat' self take nature of my fish photography lately.

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