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Mr. CEO

Are Boilies Overrated

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Are boilies overrated?

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I guess that depends on a few things. First, how highly do you rate them? Second, would be the venue.

Here in the states where most of our fish are considered "Wild" they have to be trained to accept the boilie it seems. But, once they key on that specific flavor it can be an advantage to the fisherman that is using them. 

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Tennessee carp are not used to boilies or any carp bait for that matter.  I have been told, also, that the fish need to be conditioned to them.

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I've caught good on boilies before that I made myself but in my waters sweet corn or puffs beat them everytime. Easier to open can of corn than roll boilies. The store bought boilies very very little luck.

But If I threw in 10 million I bet they work good too! I'd rather buy a 68 cent can of sweet corn than a small fortune in boilies.

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I've had great success using store bought and also home made boilies. I've had better luck getting a quick bite using corn. Corn seems to be instant while boilies often take some time. Once fish realize the nutrition content, they seem to be crazy for boilies.

It all depends on how you like to fish. Anything can work. There isn't a wrong bait out there if the fish are present and are hungry :-)

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possum, we can get canned corn at Aldi's grocery for 49 cents a can.  In fact, they are the cheapest most of the time for a lot of bait ingredients.  For instance, OI have about 9 bottles of light syrup for grits packbait.  It has been stated that many carpers go into a store and look at what might work to catch a PB.

I have some boilies I got with an order but never caught anything on them.

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I have had some luck with boilies but all of my best fish came on plain old canned sweetcorn that I usually fish over a bed of cooked and flavored field corn.

 

I guess one advantage to boilies is that small fish can't steal your bait...but as said above, conditioning fish to eat boilies could be an expensive proposition unless there is one venue you consistently fish.  I fish a lot of different places and going back regularly to throw in food is not really an option.

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I find that boilies are good when you want to read a good book without any interruptions :lol:

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used to be in my mind

90% for particles 10% boilies

now im at about 

70% boilies 30% particles

 

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It's a trick question....

In carp fishing you are using one or multiple bait items to to a multitude of things depending on how long you are planning to fish....

ATTRACTOR BAIT or Scent to bring carp into the area you are fishing. Much like the smell you get when approach a restraunt.

FEEDING BAIT usually something small and scented that will induce a curious fish to maybe test, taste or induce some feeding. Like the small candies or peanuts at the counter of a bar or restraunt to get you to start feeding.

HOLDING BAIT A recognizable food that the carp have some confidence in as a safe and recognizable food that is appropriate for the area and will keep carp in that area feeding...remember each age group and size group of carp has different needs, desires, behaviors and feeding patterns.  That's why restraunts.... have a menu with a variety of items on it.

PRESENTATION BAIT/ HOOK BAIT this is in some cases one or two or even three different baits or combinations of bait/scent/textures used to make a carp put your hook bait in its mouth. Much like a chef presents a diner on a plate....arrangement and style can determine interest, and which part of the plate gets the attention first...arrangements what sometimes gets left till last or not at all....

No one Bait is ever really better than another. Timing of how and when a bait a used and how it presented in conjunction with what is happening in the water and environment can determine and make any bait the best bait at a given moment....that's why fake corn can win tournaments, boilie introduction can make a crappy spot hold fish after some time, corn can produce instant bites, pack and puff can run up the numbers, and bread or a night crawler can produce when nothing else will...

No bait is a substitute for knowledge and practicing your skill... the hardest part is to keep learning after one technique works for you....a lot of one trick ponies will tell you one bait is better than another....it really will be up to you!

 

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Yes. I have never caught a carp on a boilie homemade or store bought. Not 1 ever. I've used K1, Dynamite & royal carp boilies. I have caught 3 fish on boilies 2 catfish & a sucker. I have caught hundreds of carp in my life. Sweet corn, flavored sweet corn, doughballs of nearly every recipe imaginable, chickpeas, range cubes, nightcrawlers etc etc have all caught carp when I used them. Do boilies work for carp? If you have a truck load to throw in a lake/river over time, sure. Throwing in a few handfuls or some chopped up and fishing on top of them even after a few days, not in my experience. 

 

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3 hours ago, The Big Worm said:

It's a trick question....

In carp fishing you are using one or multiple bait items to to a multitude of things depending on how long you are planning to fish....

ATTRACTOR BAIT or Scent to bring carp into the area you are fishing. Much like the smell you get when approach a restraunt.

FEEDING BAIT usually something small and scented that will induce a curious fish to maybe test, taste or induce some feeding. Like the small candies or peanuts at the counter of a bar or restraunt to get you to start feeding.

HOLDING BAIT A recognizable food that the carp have some confidence in as a safe and recognizable food that is appropriate for the area and will keep carp in that area feeding...remember each age group and size group of carp has different needs, desires, behaviors and feeding patterns.  That's why restraunts.... have a menu with a variety of items on it.

PRESENTATION BAIT/ HOOK BAIT this is in some cases one or two or even three different baits or combinations of bait/scent/textures used to make a carp put your hook bait in its mouth. Much like a chef presents a diner on a plate....arrangement and style can determine interest, and which part of the plate gets the attention first...arrangements what sometimes gets left till last or not at all....

No one Bait is ever really better than another. Timing of how and when a bait a used and how it presented in conjunction with what is happening in the water and environment can determine and make any bait the best bait at a given moment....that's why fake corn can win tournaments, boilie introduction can make a crappy spot hold fish after some time, corn can produce instant bites, pack and puff can run up the numbers, and bread or a night crawler can produce when nothing else will...

No bait is a substitute for knowledge and practicing your skill... the hardest part is to keep learning after one technique works for you....a lot of one trick ponies will tell you one bait is better than another....it really will be up to you!

 

very value info Larry ...

 

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This is all great info, but what I don't understand is if carp have to get used to eating boilies than why does corn catch so easily on fish who have never even seen it?

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Ahhhh,

I have answered this question before...had to go find it cause I didn't want to do all the math again...

 

Remember that the US has as many acres of farm land planted in corn as England has acres....all of it...really!

Between 650 and 840 BILLION pounds of corn is harvested in the US every year for the last 20 years.

2-4% of planted seed is lost in flooding and erosion, in addition to that there is animal consumption/waste scattering both seed and harvested corn.

3-15% of all planted corn gets plowed back in due to damage from flood insect and drought (every year) depending on the year.

3-7% of harvested corn is lost in the field during the harvest (even the most efficient new combines  leaves 90,000-115,000 kernels per acre alone, 90-100#) most leave 3 to times that.

And I have not included loses from truck loading and unloading, grain elevator loading, spillage, unloading,  train car loading and unloading, etc....etc

The amount of loose seed alone.......left on the field.....is in the neighborhood of 2,450,000,000 (2.4 BILLION) pounds, if only 2% is washed to a water way or exposed to the fish in a waterway due to flooding (and those are ridiculously low exposure numbers as 5-9% of crop land gets flooded every year for a portion of the year, and the losses due to combine in-efficiency is based on the best of the brand new machines, most loose 4-7%) your at 45 million pounds of corn finding it's way into the US waterways each year......All this from just ONE aspect of the harvest. States like Iowa, Illinois and Indiana would be looking at 6-7 million pounds of corn in the water each year.......even before the first can is opened by a fisherman.

And don't forget there is 650 to 900 kernels of corn per pound depending on the type of corn/feed.

Carp recognize corn as food here in the US. In most water sheds they are exposed to thousands and thousands of pounds, year after year for their entire life span. Under water, and in silt corn can last for years. Most rivers have sediment pockets with LAYERS of silted corn (as well as other seed including hemp seed from WW2 ) that can build up for years and become exposed when the channels change during floods.......has been happening for over a century in fact, decades before the carp arrived 140 some years ago.

 

Hope that helps...

 

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Sweet corn has no real nutritional value but I think the color, the salt and the sugar in canned corn is what triggers carp.  Plus corn is small and easy to pick up by any inquisitive fish.

Take a bright colored, small foam ball and soak it in a sugar and salt solution. You will probably catch carp on it (trust me, I use them with great result). Carp are inquisitive and small baits are easier to pick up.

As for boilies taking time to catch fish, that too can depend. If fish are in the area and you throw in some small boilies oozing out anything of nutritional value, they will probably go for it.

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i meant to say "no great nutritional value" 

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+++ this point ..

"No one Bait is ever really better than another. Timing of how and when a bait a used and how it presented in conjunction with what is happening in the water and environment can determine and make any bait the best bait at a given moment....that's why fake corn can win tournaments, boilie introduction can make a crappy spot hold fish after some time, corn can produce instant bites, pack and puff can run up the numbers, and bread or a night crawler can produce when nothing else will.." 

Dont catch me here - I'm still a learner...

small personal experience - I started to fish local for carp in 2012 at one park here - I fish two sides say A and B .. the spot B would run best - 9/10 times i catch fish there... spot A only about 30yards away occasional catch no long cast fish the shore say about 4yards about  Over time I observe on quite days summer days the fish coming close there was a tree with brid nest ..they group up these to eat of what spills out food- bird poop whatever..  I fish plain corn or whatever you can catch them.. just find their feeding spot. Again the style of fishing matters and I dont completely agree you have to give them loads of boilies to get them .. I see it in two ways

# if you are fishing method - pack or whatever with food ..then anything oh hook may work .. anything I mean anything ...I even got a take on black piece wood. while fishing method ...(dont know better word to describe it ) ..

# if you are going boilie only fishing at venue new to boilies - they you may need some amount of freebees.

 

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If you had asked me in 2012 when I first got back into the sport, I would have said "Yes".

Now, I would say, "It Depends!"

Ask me again in 5 years :swimminfish:

 

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I guess I'll just have to try my homemade boilies and see how they compare to corn. Thanks for the info!

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11 hours ago, Mr. CEO said:

I guess I'll just have to try my homemade boilies and see how they compare to corn. Thanks for the info!

Or....there is a recipe online for cornbread boilies :P

 

Maybe make the best of both worlds....

 

I haven't tried them, but they at least sound reasonable to use in conjunction with prepared field corn feed/chum

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I do use boilies on the hook bait with corn.  I'll also prepare my site/spot with maize and mixed bird seeds (no sunflower seed).  Place whole corn and bird seeds in pressure cooker with CC-Moore (or other make) of flavor liquid.  When I have sweet horse feed, I also mix a hand full in.

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7 hours ago, LeGrand said:

I do use boilies on the hook bait with corn.  I'll also prepare my site/spot with maize and mixed bird seeds (no sunflower seed).  Place whole corn and bird seeds in pressure cooker with CC-Moore (or other make) of flavor liquid.  When I have sweet horse feed, I also mix a hand full in.

 

22 hours ago, Manosteel said:

Or....there is a recipe online for cornbread boilies :P

 

Maybe make the best of both worlds....

 

I haven't tried them, but they at least sound reasonable to use in conjunction with prepared field corn feed/chum

Thanks for the ideas. The boilies I made are fish meal based with soy flour, semolina, milk powder, black pepper, chili powder, crushed egg shells, and CCMoore Robin Red liquid.

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No, they are not, when used correctly on an appropriate water.

They are not "magical" baits that will automatically bring in big fish anywhere you use them. Your venue must hold a population of big fish for a boilie campaign to be successful in capturing BIG fish.

And most likely, you need a bait campaign to make them work most effectively. They are GENERALLY, not thought of as an instant bait.

If you  have the right water, and fish population - boilies will more consistently (not always) attract and yield the larger than average fish (for that particular venue).

Are boilies on the expensive side? (they sure are - even home made ones when you consider the time and effort that goes into making them) - but on the right water, used in the right manner, they will produce bigger fish (on average) than most other "baits", on a more consistent basis.

If you're into fishing for "numbers", and "instant" catches, showing up at your swim, and tossing in some boilies as chum is NOT going to yield any great results. However, if you are patient, and not into "numbers:", a good boilie bait campaign will INCREASE (but not guarantee {there are no guarantees in fishing} )your chances of catching the biggest fish a particular water has to offer.

****Please keep in mind, that if the water you fish doesn't  hold 30 lb fish, then a bait campaign with boilies won't yield any 30 lb fish. Nor will sweet corn, rice pack, dough ball, etc.

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I have a couple bags of "the Key" stabilized and I have caught fish on them....I generally run a couple handfuls through the "Korda Krusher" and add them to my spomb mixes.  

 

Now I will say....I use a lot of small betain HNV pellets in my spod mix....I actually have some 20 mm I sometimes band onto the hook but I have not had any hook ups with that method "yet".  They are a fishmeal pellet with betain sugars....it sounds logical to me and logic is what builds my confidence in a bait.

 

My spod mix is generally prepared field corn, crushed boilies, pellet, and some of my "goo"....which is wetted, stale Italian bread and raw bran.  When I boil my field corn, I always add in a handful of star anise clusters....my wife hates it when I do that....lol...the house ends up being pretty funky when I cook field corn.

 

I have used halibut pellets but as of yet....have not scored a fish on them....but I have confidence they will work so will continue to use them.  I also have a couple jars of HNV betain hookbaits (14mm I think).  I also have faith in those....but still have not had the big bite on them.

 

I have a couple bottles of CC Moore feed stim and big bottle of hemp oil that I sometimes use....I also sometimes glug with a liquid corn deer attractant...it's basically like a molasses and has added vitamins and minerals.

 

All of that being said, my biggest fish and my most regular catches....come on a hair rig filled with sweetcorn fished over beds of the above.  

 

I give all of them a shot but facts are facts....If I am fishing 3 rods...I am generally fishing 3 different baits and the rod that will always out perform the others is the rod with the sweetcorn on the hair.  This is just the facts of my personal experience.

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