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Green Lane- Deep Creek Lake Report

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Fished Deep Creek twice over the past 3 days. Have been trying new packbait recipes and tried hair rigs for the first time.  Had some success both days. I am thankful I had my net tonight because I caught a 24 incher on a trout rod.  

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Great start!!..........depending upon where you fish, you may consider a landing matt as well, to help prevent injury to the fish.........good going!!

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The Deep Creek I am referring to is a very small lake just below the Green Lane Reservoir in Green Lane PA.  I doubt there are any real hogs in this place.  It's pretty small.

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Don't discount the size of the lake or pond.  The TN record of 53+ lbs. for a common carp came from a TWRA public fishing lake of 60 acres.  Some of the lakes in England are very small and produce some huge carp.

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What are you calling a trout rod?  Could cover a wide variety of rods.  Interested to hear what you are using.  Carp can be caught with just about any type of tackle.

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My "trout rod" is a 5' Shakespeare ultra light (2-6lb) spooled with 6lb test.   

 

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My 10 year old grandson landed a 4-4 buff Saturday morning- all by himself.  Pretty much the same outfit.  My son noticed line peeling off the spool and my grandson set the hook.  I think it had 6 lb. line on it.

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Its a decent spot for carp.  Lots of bass and crappie picking at bait, but if you can keep baited up there are a few carp in there.  Still haven't seen any sign of any big guys yet though.  Congrats to your grandson!

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nice fish 24in is a good size

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as I recall Green Lane Res. from decades ago, the carp were overpopulated, skinny, and small (most were  <10 lb.; few low-mid teens; nothing  bigger)...  not as healthy/robust as yours from Deep Creek.  if GL is still the same, you probably have a better chance at >20 lb. carp at DC, even though it's a much smaller body of water.

on the other hand, GL produced great numbers.  short UL rods were fun, but took too long per fish -- I found L/ML Steelhead rods to be the best choice to fully/quickly enjoy numerous smaller fish, yet easily handle the occasional mid-size

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9 hours ago, philaroman said:

....  short UL rods were fun, but took too long per fish -- I found L/ML Steelhead rods to be the best choice to fully/quickly enjoy numerous smaller fish, yet easily handle the occasional mid-size

As an inexpensive attempt to try "feeder" fishing, I bought two 11-foot "crappie" rods for $15 each at Academy Sports, and equipped them with Shimano Quickfire rear drag reels spooled with 8# mono (including the line, less than $35 per rod).  So far I've caught a few small grassers up to about 6 pounds, and some very small commons on them (that's about the max for the fish in the ponds where I've tried them).  The point is that the smaller fish can give a decent fight on this lighter tackle -- BUT, despite the limber tip, unlike an UL trout rod, these rods appear to have enough backbone to handle a fish that's good bit larger, should I hook one unexpectedly, or fish in other waters.

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On 8/4/2017 at 9:51 PM, needmotime2fish said:

As an inexpensive attempt to try "feeder" fishing, I bought two 11-foot "crappie" rods for $15 each at Academy Sports, and equipped them with Shimano Quickfire rear drag reels spooled with 8# mono (including the line, less than $35 per rod).  So far I've caught a few small grassers up to about 6 pounds, and some very small commons on them (that's about the max for the fish in the ponds where I've tried them).  The point is that the smaller fish can give a decent fight on this lighter tackle -- BUT, despite the limber tip, unlike an UL trout rod, these rods appear to have enough backbone to handle a fish that's good bit larger, should I hook one unexpectedly, or fish in other waters.

I use 12-16' crappie rods as a cheap alternative to float rods -- $15 is a fantastic deal & I'm sure you'll have some fun, but BEWARE!

that "backbone" you describe is an ILLUSION!!!  its purpose is to quickly hoist small fish out of brush piles and/or spread the lines in a multi-rod "spider" trolling system -- NOT to horse bigger fish!  while the butt sections may appear fairly stiff, the blank walls are really thin to keep the rods light.  furthermore,  the cheapest ones use lower quality resins & weaker graphite/composite -- I've had a couple literally EXPLODE, after a couple years of repeated abuse by double-digit carp...  albeit, that was w/ 10-20# braid & stronger front-drags -- w/ 8# mono & weaker rear-drags, you should be fine

if you really like this type of rod (I do), keep an eye out for a half-price clearance on $60-$80 rods (that's high-end in the crappie world)...  something 100% IM-6 w/ good resins & brand-name guides will lend itself much better to being taxed far beyond the rod's intended purpose & it's just more all-around enjoyable to use

also, if you like Shimano rear-drags, try the higher models w/ the Fightin'Drag Lever -- they can be used as a poorman's pseudo-Baitrunner...  the older Japan-made ones are the best, IMHO & you can find some very nice, reasonably priced ones on fleaBay

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On 8/6/2017 at 10:20 PM, philaroman said:

I use 12-16' crappie rods as a cheap alternative to float rods -- $15 is a fantastic deal & I'm sure you'll have some fun, but BEWARE!

that "backbone" you describe is an ILLUSION!!!  its purpose is to quickly hoist small fish out of brush piles and/or spread the lines in a multi-rod "spider" trolling system -- NOT to horse bigger fish!  while the butt sections may appear fairly stiff, the blank walls are really thin to keep the rods light.  furthermore,  the cheapest ones use lower quality resins & weaker graphite/composite -- I've had a couple literally EXPLODE, after a couple years of repeated abuse by double-digit carp...  albeit, that was w/ 10-20# braid & stronger front-drags -- w/ 8# mono & weaker rear-drags, you should be fine

if you really like this type of rod (I do), keep an eye out for a half-price clearance on $60-$80 rods (that's high-end in the crappie world)...  something 100% IM-6 w/ good resins & brand-name guides will lend itself much better to being taxed far beyond the rod's intended purpose & it's just more all-around enjoyable to use

also, if you like Shimano rear-drags, try the higher models w/ the Fightin'Drag Lever -- they can be used as a poorman's pseudo-Baitrunner...  the older Japan-made ones are the best, IMHO & you can find some very nice, reasonably priced ones on fleaBay

Thanks for the advice.  I'll definitely be aware of the limitations of the rods, even though "I THINK" the ones I bought are fiberglass, not graphite, so they should be reasonably forgiving.  Glass rods usually (not always) tolerate more abuse than comparably priced graphite rods.  I don't think they could sell even a cheaply made 11' graphite rod for $15.  Plus, I will probably continue using the 8# main line (or go to 10# as an absolute maximum), so if stressed,  the line would probably break before the rod.

I'll know better how they hold up the next time I go somewhere with larger fish -- provided I can connect with a few of them on this tackle.  If I find a problem (like you described) I will keep my eye out for sales on the rods you mentioned.  Good advice!

The Shimano reels with the Fightin'Drag Lever sound interesting, but I've fished for carp with spinning tackle since the 1960's - before baitrunners existed - so I'm accustomed to adjusting and re-adjusting the drag.   Fifty years ago I used both spinning tackle (Mitchell 300s) and knuckle-buster baitcasters for my carp fishing.  But more recently, I started using the inexpensive Shimano rear drag reels (for about 8 years, off and on) and I also have a set of Bass Pro "Megacast" rear drag reels.  BTW, the drags on my Shimano reels all seem to be smoother and more consistent than the drags on my BPS reels.

Edited by needmotime2fish

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oops, didn't even think of glass...  and I happen to have a cheap Zebco 10' Slab Seeker (that turned out to be old-school "tobacco" glass under the ugly silver paint & cheap snake guides) & old glass Fenwick 12' noodle -- both of those are, indeed, extremely durable, forgiving, and can handle 20+ carp, while allowing full enjoyment of small fish

I actually LIKE to fuss w/ the drag while playing a fish, but every standard rear-drag is choppy and imprecise, IMHO -- even the good ones like Shimano, Daiwa & venerable old Cardinals are merely less terrible.   the Fightin'Drag Shimano's are the only rear-drags I really like -- there's a fine-tune Lever above the main rear dial:  I find the right "ballpark" setting on the dial that's appropriate to my rod/line & use the lever for all on-the-fly adjustments in small, precise increments w/ no chance of "overexcited over-adjustment" :bonk:  ...also, I can find a lighter setting on the main dial, where lever at MIN is weak enough to leave the rod unattended & quickly slamming the lever to MAX is enough drag to set the hook (hence, the pseudo-Baitrunner)

https://www.ebay.com/sch/Spinning-Reels/36147/i.html?LH_Complete=1&_from=R40&_nkw=Shimano+(Fighting%2C+Fightin')+-(part%2Cparts%2Cstar)&_sop=13

better hurry -- they seem to be more expensive  & less abundant than 5-10 yrs. ago...  might even be better off finding a modern Malaysian model, on sale

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