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Mr. CEO

Are Rod Pods Worth it?

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Ever since I started carp fishing 3 years ago I've been using rod holders that stab into the ground and then attaching bells to the tips of my rods but I've been thinking about upgrading to an actual setup. The only reason I like the setup I have now is because I can fish with a tighter drag than I could in a rod pod so that allows for a better hook set. The things I like about the rod pod setup is that the alarms are loud enough to surely wake me up, I can fish my rods in virtually any position/height, it looks bad ass, and I can fish on concrete, gravel, hard ground etc. The only problem is the price. For 3 Delkim bite alarms, 3 snag ears, a Cygnet Grand Sniper D/L Pod, butt grabbers, and bobbins is gonna' run me around $500 from Big Carp Tackle not including shipping. Is it worth it?

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Depends...I have a great pod set up but rarely use it.  I only use it for hard ground or docks and piers where I can't stick in a bank stick.

I like the versatility of moving the rods around with bank sticks.  It allows me to spread out the rods while with a pod you have to keep everything together. 

Is the pod set up worth the $500. Only you have to decide.

Just my 2 cents.

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You can get cheaper pods.  You dont need a cygnet.  some of those cost 300 dollars.  I have a cygnet and honestly, for the money, I am not impressed.  My prologic pods were cheaper and are made better.  Its up to you if its worth it.  

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Mr. CEO, It is all about your comfort zone. Fish can be caught without a pod or carp rod or boilies etc... Some are very proud of not having to purchase anything and create their own pods and gear. At the other extreme, some want the best gear the hobby can offer. You will probably find your comfort zone somewhere in between. I have different pods and rod holders, purchased over the years which I take great care of because I enjoy the diversity and choice, i.e. short session, long session, overnight, tournaments.... I enjoy a good pod that will hold my rods off the ground and that allows me to fine tune my presentations, alarms and drop-back indicators. You may be able to find a used pod in the trading post or on line, otherwise Big Carp Tackle is good choice. 

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well, how often do you fish close to the trunk of your car, as opposed to bushwhacking?  I really wanted a nice pod, until I considered that I mostly fish "off the beaten path" -- the price of good engineering/materials is a bit prohibitive, if you can only put it to use 10X/yr.

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Thank you guys for the advice but I'm still about 50-50 on the decision. 

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trust me a pod.....if you have rocky ground...you can use alarms with banksticks....alarms...a must have......

 

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I have 8 v-'d bank sticks from Walmart for about $2-they rust and don't slide after awhile but you can put them anywhere-I fish some very steep creek banks, and two sticks per rod works well.........I do have to say though, that I have lost 2 rods from fish pulling the rods into the water!!!.......you would never think it would happen so fast, and they were right at my feet, but alas, it happens, which I don't see with rod pod videos....I don't use bite alarms, bells, etc and I do ok.........I will probably get a pod, as I will start focusing on lake fishing.......probably good to have both!!...

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Let me also give you a little tip.  I had my system down pat.  I kinda went off the deep end, and went tackle crazy.  Due to a torn shoulder from being a bodybuilder and a bad back, I am going back to my old fishing setup and going light.  

If you want a simple, cheap, setup that you can take on a huge river, big lake, little lake, sand, gravel, and pack away easily, be versatile, then you get these items.  I learned about this setup from my good friend, NY state chairman, ed wagner.  

Three fox storm poles. Longer the better.  Make sure you get the long ones.

One buzz bar

One gardner tripod adaptor.  All these items are available at big carp tackle.  More versatile and easier than this, it wont happen.  It can all be packed away in your quiver.

Here  you can see it in action.  Yo can go to any swim and adapt to the terrain.  even go over a fallen tree.  I believe this was mikes dragones setup at the CDDW back in 06.  This is what I am using now.  

post-116-1160846577.jpg

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Make sure you invest in alarms.  I am an ex match angler.  so I never used alarms.  Once I got into dedicated carp fishing, they were a must have.  I am usually making pva bags, mixing my pack or method mix, spodding, etc.  I keep busy on the bank.  I dont just sit around and wait for a bite.  You need alarms.  life saver.  

 

 

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10 hours ago, team sorano said:

Make sure you invest in alarms.  I am an ex match angler.  so I never used alarms.  Once I got into dedicated carp fishing, they were a must have.  I am usually making pva bags, mixing my pack or method mix, spodding, etc.  I keep busy on the bank.  I dont just sit around and wait for a bite.  You need alarms.  life saver.  

 

 

Yes I agree. When I buy things I try to get the best that I can afford that way I only have to buy it once. I hate sacrificing on quality. I will take your setup into consideration because I like versatile. I have until next spring to decide on my set up because I'm going to be going to Dale Hollow Lake.

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14 hours ago, team sorano said:

Let me also give you a little tip.  I had my system down pat.  I kinda went off the deep end, and went tackle crazy.  Due to a torn shoulder from being a bodybuilder and a bad back, I am going back to my old fishing setup and going light.  

If you want a simple, cheap, setup that you can take on a huge river, big lake, little lake, sand, gravel, and pack away easily, be versatile, then you get these items.  I learned about this setup from my good friend, NY state chairman, ed wagner.  

Three fox storm poles. Longer the better.  Make sure you get the long ones.

One buzz bar

One gardner tripod adaptor.  All these items are available at big carp tackle.  More versatile and easier than this, it wont happen.  It can all be packed away in your quiver.

Here  you can see it in action.  Yo can go to any swim and adapt to the terrain.  even go over a fallen tree.  I believe this was mikes dragones setup at the CDDW back in 06.  This is what I am using now.  

post-116-1160846577.jpg

Do you do anything to keep the butts of your rods on the ground? Also could I take off the storm poles and use them as bank sticks if I wanted to?

Edited by Mr. CEO

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yea you can use them as bank sticks.  They are just fatter than regular bank sticks.  

The rod butts just lay on the ground just as you would fishing with a single bank stick.  Think of this setup as  bank sticks that you can use anywhere, even on concrete or on a dock.  

I own this setup, bank sticks, rod pods, etc.  But I am trying to go back to the simple times and lighter.  Because honestly, all this carp gear, I do love it, its a drug, but its ruining my fishing sessions bc I have a lot of stuff.  

Just like in the world of modifying cars, I went too far and went down the slippery slope.  You just dont enjoy it as much.  we all watch those carp fishing shows on youtube and envision ourselves fishing that swim,  with certain pods, setups, having 50 bags, etc.  90% of the videos we watch are uk carp anglers that have special lakes made for them, clean swims, flat land, and a road to carry your gear on a BARROW.  where I fish, I cant use a barrow.  we, fish wild waters.  

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48 minutes ago, team sorano said:

yea you can use them as bank sticks.  They are just fatter than regular bank sticks.  

The rod butts just lay on the ground just as you would fishing with a single bank stick.  Think of this setup as  bank sticks that you can use anywhere, even on concrete or on a dock.  

I own this setup, bank sticks, rod pods, etc.  But I am trying to go back to the simple times and lighter.  Because honestly, all this carp gear, I do love it, its a drug, but its ruining my fishing sessions bc I have a lot of stuff.  

Just like in the world of modifying cars, I went too far and went down the slippery slope.  You just dont enjoy it as much.  we all watch those carp fishing shows on youtube and envision ourselves fishing that swim,  with certain pods, setups, having 50 bags, etc.  90% of the videos we watch are uk carp anglers that have special lakes made for them, clean swims, flat land, and a road to carry your gear on a BARROW.  where I fish, I cant use a barrow.  we, fish wild waters.  

Thank you. One last thing, how tight can you fish your drag with that setup? And can I just screw my alarms right into the storm pole if I decide to use them as bank sticks? I think I'm in the phase where I'm on the verge of barely being able to carry all my gear in one trip, and wanting to buy even more stuff. Yes I know exactly what you mean about the UK carp anglers. Sometimes I wish I were in there shoes because of the big fish but other times I don't because you have to pay for lake memberships, and the carp are heavily pressured.

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I think a pod is just anot her piece of equipment. Is it necessary? No, but they sure are useful in certain locations. What I have done to carry my gear in to a out of the way swim, is to learn how to strap everything to my  backpack. I am sure I look ridiculous, but it beats making multiple trips. 

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Even more ridiculous, but much more efficient, is the little fold-able wagons!.....I got one on sale at Walmart- I love the versatility-I can pack it, place it in the back of the van or car, then walk to most swims......I carry it across creeks and the wheels don't do well in mud, but other than that I love it!.......it collapses down well and there's a strap to hold it together.....I take net, sling, matt, 3 rods, 2 tackle boxes, vest, chair, corn buckets and waders- all fit........Beats carrying everything!!.........

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Those wagons won't make it to many of my swims. They seem to work great most places though. 

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If you are going to Dale Hollow you will want a rod pod!

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I really do like the set up that team sorano showed, but I'm sitting hear reading Discover Carp Fishing by Simon Crow & Rob Hughes, both extremely experienced carp anglers, and in one of their paragraphs in the "Cutting Down the Angles" chapter they said, "Another angle-creating method that is widely used and copied is fishing with rod tips in the air. Many people today fish like this even when they have no reason for doing so. The angle which is created between the rod tip and the line has a detrimental effect on the sensitivity of the set-up. Often a pick-up is only indicated by the twitching of the tip, with no register on the bite indicator itself. This is fine if you are fishing for rod knocks (hence me fishing with bells), but many people prefer to fish for an indication on the bite alarm rather than sitting looking at rod tips for ages on end. We have both caught fish that have only registered at the rod end by twitching the tip. Had we not been alert at these times, we believe that the fish may have had enough time to have shed the hook without the slightest indication." He then goes on to say that it is a good method for fishing over gravel bars, snags, or pads but fishing with the rods upward does have drawbacks. Obviously most takes are going to result in the fish screaming off and it probably won't matter much if there is a large angle between the rod tips and the line, but I have had many takes that were very subtle while fishing with bells and the only reason I noticed them was because I saw my rod and the bells would barely ding. Then after I picked up the rod and leaned into the hook set was when the fish would start to run. I think the fish were down there shaking their heads trying to eject the rig like you sometimes see in those underwater videos.

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It depends on where you fish. most of my spots aren't on soft ground, or have a railing so a pod might be needed. I think its worth it, especially a pod like the Cygnet Grand Sniper. The fact that you can angle your rod tips high or low is an invaluable convenience ;) 

Edited by Lizardman529

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Even more ridiculous, but much more efficient, is the little fold-able wagons!.

I would say, my little "red-wagons" have been a life & back saver over the years. The first one lasted me about 5 years, the second one, is still going strong. Sadly I have overgrown the wagon and now it's getting ridiculous with the amount of stuff I pile on there and expect to be able to drag it to the swim. A barrow in my near future.

Rod pods, bank sticks, each has their place, though I have a couple of pods there are still occasions when I will just pack a couple of sticks and the alarms, especially when traveling real light (which is a rarity for me).

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