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MattyB

Losing corn from hair rig

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Hey all, brand new carp fisher here. Having a minor major problem on my first few sessions.

 

I've followed a few video guides on how to tie a hair rig, seems simple enough... But after a few hours in the water when I pull in my rig, I'm noticing that my bait stop is gone, along with the 4 pieces of corn I've strung on it. What are some common things us newbies do that would cause this to be happening? Am I just being robbed by nuisance fish?

If anyone has dealt with this problem in their own experience, I'd love to find out what you did to solve it.

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Are you using sweet corn? If so, most fish and turtles love it. Maybe try boiled maize, or put a piece of fake corn butted up against your bait stop. That way, you still have “bait” on your hair that may well catch the elusive Carp👀

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Yes I'm using sweet corn. 4 pieces strung on the "hair" of the rig.

Fishing a reservoir that is full of carp, some catfish, and not much else other than some frogs and the occasional crayfish. Didn't think nuisance fish would be much of an issue, if anything I just expected to catch the occasional catfish as well.

 

My main concern is that the stopper might just be falling out and my corn is just falling off along with it. Is it maybe just about adding more corn so the stopper stays tight to the bait? Or re-tying a rig with a shorter hair? What kind of success can be had by just throwing the corn straight onto the hook?

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I’m pretty new too, but quickly went to maize and fake corn. Sweet corn by itself did the same thing for me. I use boiled maize with a piece of fake corn or maize at the bait stop end. You can pull it in nice and tight and it’s probably tougher for the fish to strip it. But I’m newer and someone else might have better answers!!

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Been fishing sweet corn for almost five years. Never had any trouble. Rarely get a catfish and don't remember ever getting a bluegill or anything else on it.

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14 hours ago, MattyB said:

I've followed a few video guides on how to tie a hair rig, seems simple enough... But after a few hours in the water when I pull in my rig, I'm noticing that my bait stop is gone, along with the 4 pieces of corn I've strung on it. What are some common things us newbies do that would cause this to be happening? Am I just being robbed by nuisance fish?

If anyone has dealt with this problem in their own experience, I'd love to find out what you did to solve it.

Sweet corn out of the can is generally pretty weak stuff and is pretty easy to rip off of a hook or a hair. Once, I was fishing next to a Japanese guy who used sweet corn, raw, plucked right off of an ear of corn. Seemed to work for him. I imagine the raw sweet corn is a lot tougher than the canned corn.

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Canned corn is cooked and soaks in the liquid until opened and drained. I pick the biggest and most solid kernels for the hair rig. The "empty shells" and the soft kernels go into packbait and cage mix. The Japanese angler has kernels that aren't softened by cooking and soaking. Also, his kernels would depend on the stage of development. If the corn was starting to ripen before becoming solid kernels, t hen he has hit onto something. When I lived in a farm, we would pick field corn in its early stages and it would be just like sweet corn. As it developed, kernels hardened into the familiar hard kernels like deer corn.

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Go with Supersweet corn and try different markets until you find the brand with the biggest kernels. I've found supersweet stays on better than the salted corn. Summer is the time for pesty fish and turtles which could be your case but if your losing bait without hearing the alarm then its coming of when it hits the water on a cast. This time of year its best to go with a combo of fake and sweet corn or maize to deal with the pest.

Tight lines!

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I always "side hook" sweet corn, right on the hook. (don't push the hook up through the bottom of the kernal and out the  top) Never have any issues. Always try to pick out the "meatiest" pieces, and make sure you hook it through the bulkiest portion of the kernal.....you will find that different brands of corn are more suited for  hooking than others. Generally speaking, bigger name brands seem to offer up the largest kernals....

 

Good luck!

 

 

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I started with sweet corn on the hair, but after losing it either to fish, weakening off the hook, etc., I gravitated to fake corn. I haven't seen a difference, and it save time and hassle of constantly replacing it, especially at night when you simply can't see as well. I think the carp "mouth" the fake corn and get hooked easy enough. The key is placement of your pack bait where the carp are; my packs consist of either a strawberry panko, bird seed, sweet corn, lemon panko, or soybean panko, but will shortly try using condensed milk with sweet corn juice to mix the pack.....MO

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Thank you for all the replies.

Based on the body of water I'm fishing and the general dead action my wife gets on the worms she's fishing with 30 yards away, I don't think pests are my issue. Given the feedback I think it's the canned corn itself is just weak and tearing off the hair on the cast.

Going to order some fake corn and try some maize (i've never had much luck with fake anything in my life, in any type of fishing) see if that survives this Saturday's session.

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Don't mean to hijack this thread, but based on the experiences shared here, has anybody used hominy (posole)? It's treated corn after all, and appears stronger than canned sweet corn. And for those of you who use fake corn, do you use a flavoring on it?

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Thanks again all, maize appears to be much stronger and secure on the hair, and the boilie I tested as well was especially secure.

Still got skunked, but I can at least feel like I have a fighting chance now!

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I have good luck with sweet corn on hair rigs with pack bait.  My usual method is to have the hair about an inch long and bait it with two fat, solid kernels from the can.  Too long of a hair is counter productive.  I push the hook in the pack leaving my two kernels on the hair on the outside of the pack. 

I'm not a believer in leaving the line in the water "for hours".  I get suspicious after 30 - 45 minutes, especially if I've twitches on the line, or decent activity earlier in the session, and will check to see if the corn in still on.  Sometimes it is, sometimes it's not.  I don't mind recasting like that, because every time I send another ball of pack out, I figure It is some more chum out there.  After you get to know your water, you generally get to know a sweet spot and keep casting to that spot.  Have a certain target, a tree or house or whatever on the other side that you aim at, so your rig goes out to the same small area each time.

Those little plastic bait stops for the hairs were a pain for me when I started using hairs.  I hated them.  I tried a few things and finally came up with the idea of using grass.  Cut the round grass (about a foot or so) that has the little one inch tassels on the top that are around half the diameter of a toothpick.  Cut the tassel  off and let them dry.  Of course you can use them 'green' too.  When baiting up just push the piece of grass through the hair, push the bait (corn) up against it, lightly hold the hair to keep a little pressure on the bait, pull the grass back to the edge of the corn, then snip the long end of the grass off against the corn with toenail/fingernail clippers.  Simple, easy, and quick.  Even with cold fingers.  There's always a dozen or so stems of grass in my tackle box all the time.  After a bit you'll get good at holding on to the long end of the grass when clipping it,  because if you don't it will take off, never to be found again.

And those toenail clippers are a handy item to always have along.  They are a god-send for snipping tag ends off fishing line when tying knots or cutting line.  For mono line anyway.  'Better have a sharp knife along for braid.

Ken  <:////><

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10 hours ago, Ken said:

I have good luck with sweet corn on hair rigs with pack bait.  My usual method is to have the hair about an inch long and bait it with two fat, solid kernels from the can.  Too long of a hair is counter productive.  I push the hook in the pack leaving my two kernels on the hair on the outside of the pack. 

I'm not a believer in leaving the line in the water "for hours".  I get suspicious after 30 - 45 minutes, especially if I've twitches on the line, or decent activity earlier in the session, and will check to see if the corn in still on.  Sometimes it is, sometimes it's not.  I don't mind recasting like that, because every time I send another ball of pack out, I figure It is some more chum out there.  After you get to know your water, you generally get to know a sweet spot and keep casting to that spot.  Have a certain target, a tree or house or whatever on the other side that you aim at, so your rig goes out to the same small area each time.

Those little plastic bait stops for the hairs were a pain for me when I started using hairs.  I hated them.  I tried a few things and finally came up with the idea of using grass.  Cut the round grass (about a foot or so) that has the little one inch tassels on the top that are around half the diameter of a toothpick.  Cut the tassel  off and let them dry.  Of course you can use them 'green' too.  When baiting up just push the piece of grass through the hair, push the bait (corn) up against it, lightly hold the hair to keep a little pressure on the bait, pull the grass back to the edge of the corn, then snip the long end of the grass off against the corn with toenail/fingernail clippers.  Simple, easy, and quick.  Even with cold fingers.  There's always a dozen or so stems of grass in my tackle box all the time.  After a bit you'll get good at holding on to the long end of the grass when clipping it,  because if you don't it will take off, never to be found again.

And those toenail clippers are a handy item to always have along.  They are a god-send for snipping tag ends off fishing line when tying knots or cutting line.  For mono line anyway.  'Better have a sharp knife along for braid.

Ken  <:////><

Yea, I agree- I used grass stems all the time for the sweet corn, but now use the plastic stops for the fake corn- grass stems don't work well as you will lose the majority of your fake corn when you hook a fish.....too expensive (or I am cheap :)).................

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A slice of yellow foam ear plug makes a good hookbait for fishing among corn and it pops up bootifully!

 

 

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