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Guest AnthonyR

fly gear

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If you have no room for false casts, you have two options.

Numero uno is the roll cast. Basicaally, you bring your rod tip up past 90 degrees so the line hangs a little bit behind you, and then bring it forward, so the line rolls out in a big loop. Look it up. You can't put much line out this way ( at least I can't) I think it's more of a recast thing.

Your second option, which I prefer, is to make your false cast up. That way, you don't have to worry about stuff behind you.

For stripers, use big, fishy streamers. They're predators.

It would probably be easier to just cast spoons out to them. :D

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Like I said, they're predators. Anything that looks like a fish will catch. Spoons, big saltwater Rapala minnows, big bucktail jigs (like an ounce), and even actual fish, believe it or not.

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Guest AnthonyR

Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I've decided to go with this. I know its only a 6 wt, but I am confident that that will suffice for the carp in my area. I cant believe that it included the line, backing, tapered leader, rod, reel, and flies. I hope its good, I just spent all my money on it. I should have it in about a month

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If you are looking for some good winter reading while waiting for spring fly fishing, you may want to check out a book called "Carp on the Fly" by Reynolds, Befus, and Berryman ($11.98 at Amazon.com). It kind of assumes that you already have the fly fishing thing down and mainly focuses on Carp biology, fly tactics, and flies. I have had great success with their #1 fly (Clouser Swimming Nymph).

Regarding carp equipment, I use a St. Croix 7/8 wt with a Redington Disc Drag Reel. I agree with the other posts that you generally get what you pay for. Then (like with all sports) there is marketing hype, very high priced rods and and reels, and thousands of other gadgets. I would stick with the basics, relax, and have fun.

Once you hook a 10+ pound Carp in 4" of water you will be addicted to fly fishing for them.

For your questions on Stripers, I use a 9wt rod. The backcast is shorter because I'm shooting the line from a stripping basket. The basket is essential for wade fishing in moving water (tide, river currents or surf). Regarding flies, I've caught 90% of my stripers using a chartruse and white Clouser minnow between 3-5" long (but then again I spend 90% of the time fishing with a chartruse and white Clouser minnows between 3-5" long).

I could go on but the posters here have already provided much sound advice. Go have fun!

Much Success,

Carpflyguy

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Frankie,

Sorry I never answered your question. I got my combo at Gander Mountain. But I have used the set you bought. In fact it's what I started on. I liked it a lot. I was able to catch some nice fish on it. I eventually gave it to a friend who was interested in fly-fishing.

I am notoriously frugal (I'm a cheap *!$#%) so as a result, I often disagre with most fly-fishers on what constitutes good value. Now that I have the disclaimers aside, let me get to my point.

A great rod will improve a poor caster only a little. A poor rod will not hinder a great caster. It is the person holding the rod that makes the difference. One famous caster cast an entire fly line (90 ft) WITHOUT A ROD. The rod is a tool. Learn to use the tool and the rest is easy.

You may consider putting a new line on that combo in a year or so. Putting a good line (combos seldom come with a good line) on a cheap outfit will improve it dramatically. But learn how to use what you have first.

I wish we lived closer, I'd be happy to take you out and give you a few tips. PM your address, I'll send you some flies.

Lux

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Guest catdaddy
If you have no room for false casts, you have two options.

Numero uno is the roll cast. Basicaally, you bring your rod tip up past 90 degrees so the line hangs a little bit behind you, and then bring it forward, so the line rolls out in a big loop. Look it up. You can't put much line out this way ( at least I can't) I think it's more of a recast thing.

Your second option, which I prefer, is to make your false cast up. That way, you don't have to worry about stuff behind you.

For stripers, use big, fishy streamers. They're predators.

It would probably be easier to just cast spoons out to them.  :D

i fish in tight quarters quite a bit and after alot of practice i'm to the point where i can actually shoot a little line on a roll cast but i still need more work.

swiss, i've never seen anybody false cast UP

that sounds pretty neat, so i would appreciate it if you could give me some tips or maybe links on how that works

(i fish under trees alot so that's a technique that has not occured to me yet lol)

there is a third option that i don't know how to do.

i have seen a guy on TV that was making his false casts to his left and right and then shooting the cast directly out in front of him but i only saw him do it once and i don't know which show it was on. :D

down here in Texas the stripper fishing is almost all fresh water on big lakes and the three best colors are chartruese, chartruese, and chartruese.

you mentioned spoons, one of the deadliest redfish flies around is a spoonfly

you just let it sink and (if tied correctly) it will wobble side to side as it sinks

so i imagine a spoon fly with a chartruese trailer would be killer on striper at or near the surface.

dlspoonfly_gold.jpg

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Guest AnthonyR

I fish for stripers in the ocean(where they belong! :D ) and I always see schools of literally 100's and 100's of tiny baitfish, so maybe I should try something that imitaes a small fish? And this might sound stupid to a real fly fisherman, but would it be okay to coat the fly with fish attractant? I have had good luck with a certain brand

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make your false cast up

It's called a steeple cast in the books. It isn't as hard as it sounds. Just stop your backcast a lot sooner. I'm oversimplifying, but not much. You will lose a little distance on your forward cast, but not as much as when the trees grab your fly. :D

As for attractant... Fly fishing purists will tell you it's a no-no. It's up to you. It's only recently (last 60 years ?) that people frowned on tipping a fly with a maggot or piece of a worm. I can personally tell you it's tough to keep sweet corn on the hook when fly casting.

Lux

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Guest AnthonyR

When should I put the fish "on the reel"? Can I fight a 25 LB carp with do disc drag and a 6 wt line? And If I thoroughly clean and oiled the reel after use, could I use it in saltwater?

I just orders the rod/reel today, and id like to practice on bluegill. I have caught bluegill on a dry fly(i just found it on the ground, tied it to my baitcasting setup, and dropped it in the water) But at the pond i fish in, the ground is a mess of leaves, trash, and trees. It is also as turbid as black ink. Would a wet fly work or would it get lost on the bottom?

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Anthony,

Sight fishing is by far easier and more productive than any other method I've experienced in fly fishing for carp. If you employ some of the same methods as bait fishermen do (i.e. chum an area), then you can up the percentages of catching. If you let bread float on the surface does this get the carp in your area feeding on the surface? It is always very exciting to catch a carp from the surface be it with the fly rod and some kind of bread fly, or just live lining bread with an ultralight spinning rod. Do what you can to put the percentages in your favor and catch a few carp. Then for variety, go to a creek and/or a river and hone your skills on river fish. No matter what method is used you will be developing skills you can use for a lifetime. Enjoy-that is the key to any fishing. Good luck and tight lines! :D

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Guest AnthonyR

I just found out that the reel im getting has a "clicker" type drag system. Exactly how does this work?

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A clicker is one of those things that is easily understood by looking at it, but would require hours of explanation unseen.

Hopefully your reel should have an exposed lip on one side (again, you'll get it when you see it) you can palm the spool with that and add friction drag.

Lux

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Guest catdaddy

good bait fish imitation flies are decievers and sea-deucers, for stripers, chart or chart/white

the clicker is just a tab of metal that the gear teeth on your reel clicks when the reel is turning backwards (line is going out)

this is just like the drag clicker on your conventional gear with one very big exception:

the handle of your fly reel will have to turn also.

on your baitcaster, your handle can stay still and the spool still lets out line against the drag

you will have to let go of the fly reels handle in order for the fish to pull line out against your drag setting

the max drag weight is probably going to be around 6lbs but when you multiply that over your 8-9' fly rod, you can put 3x that much pull on the fish and your tippet will have to be able to handle it.

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Guest AnthonyR
good bait fish imitation flies are decievers and sea-deucers, for stripers, chart or chart/white

the clicker is just a tab of metal that the gear teeth on your reel clicks when the reel is turning backwards (line is going out)

this is just like the drag clicker on your conventional gear with one very big exception:

the handle of your fly reel will have to turn also.

on your baitcaster, your handle can stay still and the spool still lets out line against the drag

you will have to let go of the fly reels handle in order for the fish to pull line out against your drag setting

the max drag weight is probably going to be around 6lbs but when you multiply that over your 8-9' fly rod, you can put 3x that much pull on the fish and your tippet will have to be able to handle it.

Will I ruin it if I use it in the ocean?

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Probably. Although you could try coating the entire interior of the reel in WD40, and rinsing, cleaning, and regreasing everything when you're finished. Cheap fly reels aren't exactly built to handle saltwater.

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Guest carpfly
I dont need features like drag(i dont use drag anyway)

You might want to reconsider this. A carp is a powerful fish and they can go on long runs. It is possible to do things like palm the reel but you do need some way to slow the fish down and tire it out. The reel I use does have an excellent drag but I prefer to use a piece of leather attached to the reel as a manual drag (a la Lefty Kreh).

Tom Conner

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Guest AnthonyR

I just got the fly combo in the mail today. I went outside to practice casting a piece of yarn and its harder than I thought. I can only cast 10 to 15 feet before problems arise. On each false cast backward, I am hitting the ground.

And i got the tapered leader but its all coiled up. How should I straighten it out?

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How should I straighten it out?

Let a big fish do that for you!! :D

I just pull a bit on them to straighten them a little.

If your backcast is hitting the ground, stop the rod sooner and harder. Some will tell you to imagine standing in a clock face. 12 is above your head, 3 horizontal in front of you and 9 horizontal behind you. The old wisdom is the rod should stop at 10:00 on the back cast and 2:00 on the false cast. I prefer 11:00 and 2:00. Helps keep me out of the grass. Also, unless you look (and probably even if you do) you ar going back beyond 10:00.

Check out the beginners section at this site:

Fly Anglers Online

They are the best.

Lux

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Guest AnthonyR

and just when you think i couldnt possibly have another question, her it goes: Is it absolutely necessary to use a tapered leader as opposed to just regular mono?

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A tapered leader does help put the fly out there smoother. It isn't essential. I often use 6 lb mono instead. You'll find a tapered leader is helpful, especially small flies. A heavier leader is much more likely to spook fish in shallow water too.

Lux

BTW, I really will be mailing you a package, just haven't got there yet.

Lux

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I use plain mono as a leader because I'm poor. It works fine.

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Guest AnthonyR

I just found out that a tackle store about an inch from my house sells 5LB test tapered leaders and fly line.

If I am out of leaders and choose to use mono, could I possibly even use braid if stealth isnt necessary? Mono has memory and I find braid much easier to work with.

Im having a hard time tieing the nail knot. The stiff end off the leader is much different from the supple braid i am used to tying. I found that If I tie a uniknot onto the fly line with the tippet, It achives the same effect as the knail knot. Should I do this, or is it weaker. And is it okay to use superglue?

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Dont use braid for a leader. You need the stiffness of mono to push the fly over the loop as your cast straightens.

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