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Which State for a vacation???

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Hi All

Firstly Im not from the USA so please excuse my stupid questions.My names Colin and Im from Scotland,Ive flyfished for 25 or so years and now love to combine travel with flyfishing.Ive made a fair few trips to the USA fishing for Steelhead,Trout,Stripers,Reds etc.

Only recently did I start to find out about the wonderfull Carp fishing you guys have,Ive been looking round some of the Blogs and sites on the web and these Big wild Carp are simply stunning.Stalking them with fly in skinny water must be superb sport,I also love the flies you guys have developed for the purpose-sort of bonefish/trout fly hybrids.

So my question is- which State would you recommend for a Carp on fly Vacation?

From what I read Carp are very wide spread so I could use advice on where to try.Not looking for secret spots just looking for some pointers on where you think is my best bet for a chance of catching.

Id be coming in late June which seems a good month,hiring a car and staying in cheap motels, maybe a day or 2 with a guide but I prefer DIY,I like road trips and seeing new places so covering distance is no problem.

Ive ordered "Carp on the fly" by Barry Reynolds , It may answer some of my questions but Id love to hear what you think?

All the best and have a great new year

Colin

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Guest Carpenter 07

I've always wanted to go to Lake Michigan, specifically Traverse City Bay. There are a couple carp fly guides in the area and from what I've read it's supposed to be a great area. I would also look into Lake St.Claire near Detroit Michigan, the lake is split down the middle with Canada and I have read great things about the carp action there. I have never been to either lake but plan to fish them some day. Here are a couple links that I've found.

Good Luck

Ray

http://www.flyfishingconnection.com/articl...+-+Flats+Style/

http://www.flymartonline.com/modules.php?n...cle&sid=403

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I would say MI as well. From what I've read the great lakes are perfect for fly fishing for carp. Tons of big flats, clear water, and large fish. I feel pretty fortunate here in OR as well. The Columbia has some fantastic carp fishing. ID is well known as well but if I could go one place in the US to chase carp with a flyrod, I'd be heading to the flats of the great lakes in MI.

I think there are much bigger carp in other parts of the country, but what makes fly fishing so unique is the water type. MI, ID and OR all have extensive shallow water flats (1-3 ft deep) in clear water where you can stalk carp more easily. I'm sure that if you know an area you could find this type of water in any carp hotspot (I know they get big carp in the northeast, and in TX) but MI would probably be easier to find the water type you need. And, as mentioned, you could hire a guide.

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I would say Eastern Washington/Idaho would be first pick

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Yup, Nine Mile just northwest of Spokane is absolutely gorgeous and there are carp there. R6 lives close to the campground and even though chumming is not allowed he had the foresight to feed the ducks for me before I went. He goes carping with another expat nearby in Idaho on the Snake River as well. We can hook you up! B) Washington state does not require a license for carp fishing, so that's a bonus.

Edited by buzzbomb

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NOT NJ - not much to see here. . . apart from a good view of Manhattan if you happen to be on the Hudson somewhere. . .

-- tight lines

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Washington state does not require a license for carp fishing, so that's a bonus.

I am not sure that is true anymore, and I would get one just to avoid complications with the man if fly fishing/stalking.

They take them trouts and salmon serious up there.

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Washington state does not require a license for carp fishing, so that's a bonus.

I didn't want to argue on the other thread about this point, but Buzzbomb is 100% and accurate (as of the 2009 laws in WA). Also, more than one rod can be used while carp fishing...

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Yes Id buy a licence for whatever the laws are in the State, money goes back to help the fishing in some way or another-plus the wildlife guys have big bloody guns! us Brits are not really used to that.

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You don't need a license to carp fish in WA...I tested that out one time. I buy one anyway, mainly because with a flyrod, more often than not they'll assume you are chasing smallmouth bass. Times are changing and I don't think it would be as big of a concern now.

You can't chum in WA/OR, and they take that very seriously. If you get caught feeding the ducks with a rod nearby, they'll take your gear.

If you head to the PNW I can probably help out with some fly friendly water.

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I'd take the others' advice and check out the flats on Lake Michigan. Big Carp water there. John has showed us some of the legendary carp monsters from the Columbia. I think wherever you may be headed, you'll be able to find some productive waters and enjoy yourself. I'd be more looking for other fish opportunities in addition to just carp, to help sway the deal. And maybe some other social influences you might be interested, i.e. arts and culture, etc. near where you'd want to fish.

If for some reason you decide to head to Minnesota, let me know, and I can help point you in the right direction.

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Guest Windknot
Guest Toesup
You don't need a license to carp fish in WA...I tested that out one time. I buy one anyway, mainly because with a flyrod, more often than not they'll assume you are chasing smallmouth bass. Times are changing and I don't think it would be as big of a concern now.

You can't chum in WA/OR, and they take that very seriously. If you get caught feeding the ducks with a rod nearby, they'll take your gear.

Correct, you dont need a license in WA if speciffically going for Carp... however, thats going to be difficult to prove to a F&G officer who got out of the bed on the wrong side that you are targetting Carp only.

You CAN however chum in WA...

1/ Common Carp are NOT considered to be 'game fish', they are however 'food fish'.

This means that no license is required if you are specifically targetting Common Carp.

2/ As The Wa. F&G states "No chumming for game fish" and Common Carp are NOT game fish, then you ARE allowed to chum for them.

3/ If you are specifically fishing for Common Carp and catch another species, then you must immediatly return it to the water. If you keep the other species of fish (such as a Cat) then you MUST have a license.

4/ Even though you dont need a license to fish for Common Carp, you are limited to ONE rod.

From this discussion..

http://www.carpanglersgroup.com/forum/inde...=29833&st=0

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I look at the chumming thing like I do the license thing...good luck convincing the officer you are only after carp!

The one time I tested the theory I was able to point at some carp I had just been casting to, and the officer walked away saying have a good day...but I'm with you. I buy a license every year on the off chance that they decide I must be fishing for smallmouth.

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I would say MI as well. From what I've read the great lakes are perfect for fly fishing for carp. Tons of big flats, clear water, and large fish. I feel pretty fortunate here in OR as well. The Columbia has some fantastic carp fishing. ID is well known as well but if I could go one place in the US to chase carp with a flyrod, I'd be heading to the flats of the great lakes in MI.

I think there are much bigger carp in other parts of the country, but what makes fly fishing so unique is the water type. MI, ID and OR all have extensive shallow water flats (1-3 ft deep) in clear water where you can stalk carp more easily. I'm sure that if you know an area you could find this type of water in any carp hotspot (I know they get big carp in the northeast, and in TX) but MI would probably be easier to find the water type you need. And, as mentioned, you could hire a guide.

About the only thing I'd argue with you is the thought that Michigan does not have carp the size found in other parts of the country.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

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About the only thing I'd argue with you is the thought that Michigan does not have carp the size found in other parts of the country.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

I have to agree with Nightwing, I think the Great Lakes have the potential to hold the biggest carp in North America. If you want to have a blast, and catch tons of fish from the teens to the low thirties, and have absolutely no competition, come on out to South Dakota, and fish the 'Little Carp on the Prairie' with me!! B)

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I have to agree with Nightwing, I think the Great Lakes have the potential to hold the biggest carp in North America. If you want to have a blast, and catch tons of fish from the teens to the low thirties, and have absolutely no competition, come on out to South Dakota, and fish the 'Little Carp on the Prairie' with me!! B)

The South Dakota reference here - is it sight fishing? It's close enough to me to merit a look. Need to see the fish though.

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The South Dakota reference here - is it sight fishing? It's close enough to me to merit a look. Need to see the fish though.

Yeah, you can see them alright, they roll and tail constantly, especially on Lake Thompson. You might not be able to cast to one just sitting there very easlliy, but just put the fly where they are tailing and rooting around, and you will get some takes. B)

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Michigain or the Dakota's HUGE CARP up there. the CAG 50 will come from the great lakes.

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I'd fish MI in a second. Didn't mean to offend with that comment. It seems like TX and the NE is where I see the reports of really big 40+ lb fish. I'm sure the Columbia has carp that size as well...can't wait to run across one on the flats!

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Michigan was my first thought as well, but places like Fly Fishers have guided trips out of Green Bay Wis as well. Just on the other side of the pond so to say. The truth is that carp are so much more plentiful in this country and they are much more uneducated than any fishing that you have seen in your own country, I would pick a spot in the country that you want to visit, maybe bring the family and you will find good fishing close by.

Some Wisconsin sites:

http://www.theflyfishers.com/shoptrips.php...d083bdbfea63d64

http://www.tightlinesflyshop.com/

http://www.driftlessangler.com/ While Mat may not guide for carp, YET. He did just go to Michigan himself on a trip recently and may be a weath of information, he also posts on this board.

Rick

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