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US Best Lake for Carpfishing


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Guest phonebush

Oscar,

For lots of large fish the "best" lake in the US is no doubt Toledo Bend in LA - TX. It is a huge lake but has very limited bank space and lots of bow hunters on the Southern end near the Gulf of Mexico. Still, it has both the most and largest "specimen" in the US. My pb came from Bull Shoals lake in MO. There are definately plenty of 50+ lb specimen in the bayous of LA - again difficult to get to.

For Northern fish - I'd have to agree Lake MI has undiscovered "specimen" fish. Northern fish live longer but grow half as fast as Southern fish (feeding seasons). Northern waters have a more likely population of small to midsize fish to complement the specimen.

NO FACTS - just my opinion and experience.

The word "best" is really difficult isn't it?

Phone

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I know phone, it is very difficult as every fisherman has its own opinion according to their experiences, and well, it hasn't to be a lake, its just that I'm used to fish lakes :rolleyes: but I realise you guys have nice rivers for carp fishing, like the hudson or the one Scott metions.

The thing is that I'll start writing for a Sapnish Mag next january, and would like to talk every issue about the lakes that produce the best fish in our continent, from Alaska to Argentina, so . . .

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im sure there are some un fished carp waters that hold some real lumps. along side the bigger rivers witch is really any ones game.... as to whats in them well that's a hole other story. i would say from what i have seen come from ladybird (formally town lake) in TX many PB's in the same trip for some. or a trip to upstate NY to the some of the big rezi's Ashocan or Tommahnock would nice.

just my 2 cents.

Joel

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Aside from being our home lake richypoo.. I would say it is one of the better wild water lakes in the midwest The pure amount of food that is in this lake for carp is scary. I have seen plenty of 30+ fish and some bigger ones in the past 2 years you always end up hooking a few monsters on walleye gear in the early spring.

The lake is connected to Lake Michigan so we also get lake run fish as well as resident lake fish.

The only problems with the lake is its SIZE!! The lake is huge and hosts ALOT of fish, but in saying that finding the REAL big ones can be a bit daunting!

The lake has a warm water discharge on one end with a river that dumps in. In the middle of the lake it boasts a creek with a drowned creek mouth that dumps into some deeper sand bottom swims

I hope this year to fish Kalamazoo lake which is part of the Kalamazoo river system and the Grand River system. Both are major systems with some monster potential.

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Guest phonebush

Oscar,

For specimen fish the lower Mississippi River (from Saint Louis South) would have to rank #1. It's just that it is SOOOooooo large and so heavily populated with "average" carp you don't have much more than a 1000/1 chance of catching "the fish". I don't consider that a "best" set of circumstances. Unless you are netting fish to sell to a catfood factory, then it would be "best".

Phone

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Great suggestions you guys have posted here, I haven't thought about some of them.

Its gonna be a difficult choice this way, maybe I could talk every issue about the lake or river that has produced the biggest fish for CAG in the past months, E.G. the lake where Mike got his piggy mirror.

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Great suggestions you guys have posted here, I haven't thought about some of them.

Its gonna be a difficult choice this way, maybe I could talk every issue about the lake or river that has produced the biggest fish for CAG in the past months, E.G. the lake where Mike got his piggy mirror.

Mike got his piggy mirror the same lake I got mine in my avatar... Pubnoway Lake.

:rolleyes:

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So scottevil, what are some others I could use? Lets say, the top 5 for u?

I can't honestly answer that question since I have yet to fish outside of Texas. But if your looking at your best shot at a 40 then you got to look at Tennessee or New York

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Guest phonebush

Oscar,

I have a theory. I say, in general, the largest carp in the United States are along a line roughly 50 - 75 miles either side of the 35th latitude. That would include from East Coast to West Coast. I could overlay a map and give you the names of some of the lakes I have successfully fished if you think it would be fun. I'm still not sure what you want? For example, the "best" lake in New Mexico would fit the bill. Still, the largest carp in NM tend to be smaller than - - say - - TX even though the lakes may be on the same latitude. Several reasons dominate my thinking - altitude and temperature become very important in the West and some lakes in Eastern TN-KY-etc. (I suspect altitude and temperature play a role in Mexico also).

The key for success in these lakes is that they probably provide optimum conditions - water temperature, feed (that requires a specific amount of sunlight), maybe even the proper rhythm of daylight and others. I often wanted to do more precise data collection on the 35th latitude but time escaped me.

I don't want to impose on Scotts answers. For myself I found all the lakes on the Colorado River in TX to be about equal. Some are extremely difficult to bank fish or offer bankfishing accomodations (at least in my limited experience). The lakes on the Colorado River in TX East of Austin are "better" than those West.

Farther North - well - I am not an expert at least by experience. If those guys are going to brag on their fish they will have to tell you WHY? for themselves. I certainly know they have some large fish. It is my theory they, Northern carp, simply live longer absent some diseases in more temperate water of the 35th and strong stocks of predator fish in the North cull a smaller carp hatch yearly. Northern survivors get larger and live longer.

Still, if you can "get through" the hugh populations the biggest fish live in "my zone". ------- Maybe? ----------

Phone

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Not saying it's the best in the country, but the Connecticut River and it's backwaters and tributaries are great. I know there's carp over 50 lbs. in there somewhere and determined to catch him/ her. I'll keep you posted when I do. Might take awhile though. lol! Gotta catch my 40+ first.

Edited by carpaddict82
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Not saying it's the best in the country, but the Connecticut River and it's backwaters and tributaries are great. I know there's carp over 50 lbs. in there somewhere and determined to catch him/ her. I'll keep you posted when I do. Might take awhile though. lol! Gotta catch my 40+ first.

Lol, I know, it takes so long to get a nice 40, I still haven't either, but working on that.

Phone, I agree with you, elevation does have something to do with the size carp can reach, we have witnessed that, right now I'm trying a small pond at 2000 mts, lets see how that turns out. don't know if the parallel 35 has something to do with carp, but sure elevation does. :rolleyes:

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