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(GA) needmotime2fish

My Apologies to Ray Charles

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Ray's famous song lamented "A Rainy Night in Georgia". Unfortunately, we Georgia CAG-ers are dealing with "A Rainy YEAR in Georgia".

Today has been yet another day of rain. Through July, the Atlanta area has already received almost as much rain as it usually gets in twelve months. If the last five months of August through December get their 'average' rainfall, the total for the year will be about 20 inches above normal. Even Lake Lanier, which is usually 7 to 10 feet low this time of year, is 2-1/2 feet above "full pool".

Many of our best fishing spots are no longer accessible because of high water levels, and some of the rivers aren't fishable for the same reason. Even where it is still possible to fish, it's difficult to establish a baiting schedule because of the weather. Personally, I have little inclination to waste my bait or my time in preparing a spot, and then not be able to fish because of bad weather.

Don't get me wrong -- nearly everyone in the state is happy that we're not going through another summer drought. And the rainy weather has kept summer temperatures down, well below our usual 90-degrees, which has reduced the load on my air conditioner (and my wallet). Also, the reports I've read suggest that some of the local anglers who target other species have done pretty well -- maybe because of the increased rainfall and the lower temperatures.

Realizing that with no pre-baiting, our chances for success won't be great, but we'll still head out between rainy days and try to catch a few. Meanwhile, we'll be looking forward to better carping weather this fall.

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We have had the same here in SE TN. Local TV station said we are 18 inches over our normal rainfall for this time of the year. This would be good for tailwater trout fishing so we have lots of water. Cooler temps are good, too.

Off time is good to work on rods and reels, tie hair rigs, make boilies, etc. Keep the coffee maker close.

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Realizing that with no pre-baiting, our chances for success won't be great

You folks that are in States that allow you to pre-bait are spoiled :knifefork: !!!

Actually, i'm just jealous, i'd give my right arm, ok, perhaps not my arm as then i'd have trouble casting, how about the nail from my left index finger? (it could grow back) to be allowed to pre-bait, spod, catapult bait out etc, here in Colorado !

Glad you are still getting out there, I am sure you will bank a few and you may be surprised what ends up in your landing net.... heck if you don't have a line in the water you will never catch ought !

John

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I am getting the dt's from not being able to fish. This high water and constant generation is putting a hurting on my ability to fish. It looks like for the next ten days there is only a 10-20% chance of rain, so maybe just maybe I might get to get out.

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Realizing that with no pre-baiting, our chances for success won't be great, but we'll still head out between rainy days and try to catch a few.

I second John on this one, you guys dont know how good you got it LOL

Try finding places out of the current on flooded fields and use tiger nuts/worms, especially if there is a drainage ditch running across the area which gives a bit of depth and a path for them to follow.

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I fondly remember years ago when we never prebaited. We went to the river and used canned sweet corn or a jello/shredded wheat dough ball directly on the hook and caught decent numbers. Just get out there and have fun. :party0012icon:

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I fondly remember years ago when we never prebaited. We went to the river and used canned sweet corn or a jello/shredded wheat dough ball directly on the hook and caught decent numbers. Just get out there and have fun. :party0012icon:

Some of the best advice I've seen on the forum in a long time! Especially " Just get out there and have fun."

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I fondly remember years ago when we never prebaited. We went to the river and used canned sweet corn or a jello/shredded wheat dough ball directly on the hook and caught decent numbers. Just get out there and have fun. :party0012icon:

Amen to that! I agree with you 100%. Growing up, I never heard of pre-baiting - in fact, it's only since I joined CAG that I started doing it. Back "in the day" (that would be in the 1960's :Old: ), I fished creeks and rivers and caught carp on canned corn or doughballs. And in the 1970's & 80's, I even managed to catch a quite few at Lake Lanier the same way. But more recently, I've rarely caught many carp there, unless I've prebaited a bit.

Shoot -- before I joined CAG, I'd never even heard of packbait or method mix, either. Back then, I just rigged a hook and sliding sinker, and cast my corn or doughball to a likely-looking spot and waited for a run. These days, however, it seems like the carp can't locate my (hook)bait/pickup unless it's surrounded by a pile of pack bait -- especially at Lake Lanier, where I do most of my

fishing. I know Lanier is full of carp, so maybe I've been fishing in the wrong places. Or maybe the extremely heavy recreational use that the lake is subjected to every year has just scattered the carp a lot more than they were 30 years ago. Regardless of the reason, my opinion is - based on recent experience - pre-baiting and using pack are almost necessities for fishing at Lanier these days.

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I will say that most of the places I fish on Lake Hartwell or Lake Russell do not require prebaiting, just throw out and they will come. The only problem I am having this year are two things. One lake Hartwell was down for years and almost all water shallower than 15 feet is choked full of rotting weeds that grew while the lake was down. So much weeds that everycast brings back a litteral net full of weeds. Second with all this rain the lakes are almost two foot above full pool and the places that were fishable are now sitting under water with the water backed up into the trees. So that creates no room to set up or even cast.

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With Lake Lanier still more than 2 feet above full pool, the walkway area is still under water and closed for public use. Tim & I planned to fish adjacent to the swimming area today, so i fished 4 or 5 hours on Monday, mainly to pre-bait for today. I had zero action on Monday (I "thought" I saw one of my rod tips bounce slightly once, but I think it was just wave action). I didn't even see any fish activity on the surface. I spodded a gallon of soaked maize, and also used the catapult to shoot a couple pounds of old frozen boillies.

On Tuesday, we managed just two screaming runs. I landed one, a very "pretty" fish with lots of gold color, but only 4 or 5 pounds. I lost the other one at the bank. We fish in a "no wake zone", and as I was bringing the fish toward the net, a large boat came flying in, running wide open. I was about to shout at the guy when I realized the lettering on the side of the boat said "Park Ranger". They stayed in the area for about 30 seconds, turned around, and went flying off -- again at full speed. Anyway, I was distracted just enough to ignore the fish for a few seconds, and the hook pulled. The fish was a little larger than the other one, but not by much. I didn't mind losing it, but i was upset that the "Park Ranger" decided that it was perfectly OK for him to disregard the No Wake zone. I would have understood if he was responding to an emergency or handling some sort of law enforcement task. But whatever they were doing was some "routine" operation, and there was no need for them to violate the law.

I was also a bit surprised today, when I had two "runs" on boilies, and failed to hook either fish. Both fish ran the drag enough to set off the bite alarm, but quit. I tightened the slack line, and watched as the fish "bit" again and again -- pulling up slack, then dropping it back. After watching this for about a minute, I tried pulling to set the hook when the fish slowly pulled out most of the slack and started pulling down the rod tip. I failed to hook either fish. I was using two small boilies (approx 10 mm diameter) with a small foam lifter, on a hair rig tied on a #4 hook. I rarely miss fish when using boilies, so I'm still a bit confused.

We did check out a new swim that appears to be worth trying. It's in a quieter area, less affected by boat traffic, and it seems to have some shallow weeds nearby that should hold carp. Maybe we'll finally hit a swim that won't require pre-baiting. It's also convenient to parking, and shouldn't be affected by high water. We'll try it next week -- AFTER the busy Labor Day weekend.

Edited by needmotime2fish

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